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Note-for-Note Piano Transcriptions

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Most piano sheet music of hit recordings is very inaccurate, often including incorrect chords and almost never giving the exact keyboard part. For example, have you ever tried to find the sheet music for the piano part in The Beatles' classic, "Lady Madonna"? There's lots available, but none is correct; most piano transcriptions are not even close.

Over the years I've picked out precisely the keyboard parts for many classic recordings: for my own high-school cover band as a teenager, to the keyboard tracks in the hits by The Beach Boys, Ricky Nelson, and Rod Stewart, to perform onstage with them around the world. Also, The Beach Boys themselves taught me exactly the keyboard voicings that they used on their hit records, some quite ingenious.

All the piano sheet music on this page has been created by me, Elmo Peeler, a conservatory-trained professional rock pianist/arranger/conductor. My passion in life has been the piano - playing it and composing for it. Over the years I've toured the world, playing and arranging for three Hall-of-Fame rock artists: The Beach Boys, Ricky Nelson, and Rod Stewart. If you'd like to see me play, there are video links on the Boogie-Woogie Sheet Music page.

As a response to colleagues and students who have asked me to teach them those keyboard parts, I've created piano sheet music (or organ sheet music for "Green Onions", "A Whiter Shade of Pale", "The House of the Rising Sun" and others) that is note-for-note accurate - perfect piano transcriptions.

Whether you:

these note-for-note transcriptions will prove extremely helpful.

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If you need a note-for-note accurate piano transcription of a particular song - or just the keyboard solo, custom transcriptions, i.e., transcriptions-by-request, are available. See customer testimonials and contact me for pricing.

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The pianists and organists whose performances are available here in note-for-note accurate piano transcriptions include:

Booker T. & The M.G.'s - Green Onions - Intro & 1st Verse
(Organ part, transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Green Onions" has been a favorite of mine since the age of 14, when my high school rock-and-roll band played it at every gig. Though elegantly simple, it can be difficult to pick out.

"Green Onions" was originally recorded in Memphis in 1962 by the Stax Records "house band", Booker T. & the M.G.'s. The line-up was Booker T. Jones, keyboards (Hammond M3 organ), Steve Cropper on guitar, Lewie Steinberg on bass ("Duck" Dunn joined the band three years later), and Al Jackson, Jr. (now deceased) on drums.

That rhythm section is the same group you hear on most Otis Redding records (including "Dock of the Bay") and some Wilson Pickett records ("In the Midnight Hour" was co-written by Steve Cropper) - basically most of the records by various artists at Stax in Memphis, Tennessee.

This is the Hammond organ part for the Intro and the First Verse, note-for-note. Although this does not include the organ solo, which doesn't begin until the Second Verse, these beginning sections define the entire song and are essential to performing it correctly. You'll love playing this great old classic and having it sound just like the record.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Booker T. & The MG's - Green Onions (Intro & Verse 1)

Adele - Someone Like You - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the most hauntingly beautiful songs ever written, Adele co-wrote this emotional song with Dan Wilson, who plays the beautiful, hypnotic piano on the recording.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 4:45, comprising 80 measures. You'll love playing this amazing hit by Adele exactly as it was recorded.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Adele's "Someone Like You" on YouTube.

Albert King - Crosscut Saw - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Crosscut Saw" is a twelve-bar blues classic, first released in 1941 by Mississippi bluesman Tommy McClennan. In 1966 Albert King recorded his own version, using Booker T. & the MG's as his backing band. Since then, it has become a blues classic, recorded by many artists, from Otis Rush to Eric Clapton to Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Albert King's recording, released on his "Born Under a Bad Sign" album, contains 7 verses and a wonderful piano part played by Booker T. Jones. Booker T.'s piano part uses rhythmic Right-hand chords over a New Orleans-influenced Left-Hand bass part, that is an excellent study in Left-hand/Right-hand co-ordination. True to form, Booker T. never overplays, playing just the right notes at just the right time to provide the perfect rhythmic foundation for Albert King's vocals and guitar-playing. This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano part - all 2:35 - all 7 verses (it fades out during the 7th verse). If you'd like to study Booker T.'s piano style while further developing your own Left/Right coordination, this is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Albert King's "Crosscut Saw" on YouTube.

Alicia Keys - Empire State of Mind (Part II) Broken Down (Intimate 'Acoustic' Studio Performance) (transcr. by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 2009 Alicia Keys released a video performance of a two-minute version of "Empire State of Mind", which she co-wrote, on the Deluxe edition bonus DVD with her "Element of Freedom" album. The first half of the song is a classically-influenced instrumental piano intro, building to a dramatic transition into the vocal section.

This is a transcription of the entire 1:59 performance. If you'd like to play this beautiful classically-inspired pop/R&B song just like Alicia Keys, this will allow you to do it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Alicia Keys - Empire State of Mind, Pt. II (Intimate 'Acoustic' Studio Performance) - Intro only

Alicia Keys - Wild Horses - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

On July 4, 2005, on MTV's "Unplugged" show, Alicia Keys performed one of the most beautiful performances of "Wild Horses" ever, in her duet with Adam Levine. Her piano begins the song, ends the song, and dominates everything in between - a haunting, achingly romantic, elegant reinterpretation of the Rolling Stones' classic.

This is a note-for-note transcription of every note that Alicia Keys plays - all 6:04 of the song!

Alicia Keys is a classically-trained pianist, with a refined touch and elegant style. If you've ever wanted to study Alicia Key's piano style, this transcription is perfect for you.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Alicia Keys' "Wild Horses" on YouTube.

The Allman Brothers Band - Jessica - Piano Solo from Tutorial Video (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

When The Allman Brothers Band released "Jessica" in 1973, suddenly the world knew about keyboardist Chuck Leavell, who improvised a classic piano solo on the recording. That solo became so famous that Leavell picked it out from his own recording and memorized it, so that he could perfectly replicate it in The Allman Brothers' live performances. In 2007, thirty-four years after recording it, Leavell released a tutorial video explaining the solo. It's 68-bar structure is:

1) Exposition
2) Descending Figure
3) Slide Down
4) Accents
5) Octaves
6) Hammered 4th's
7) Rolling Figure
then into the Guitar Solo...

This is a note-for-note transcription of Chuck Leavell's entire (1:27) "Jessica" piano solo - both hands - exactly as he plays it on current tours - very similar to, but not exactly the same as the original 1973 recording. Study this classic solo in detail, and learn to play it yourself, precisely as Chuck Leavell does.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Allman Brothers Band - Jessica - Piano Solo

The Allman Brothers Band - Jessica - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

This is a transcription of the right hand part of the classic piano solo as played by Chuck Leavell, note-for-note, directly from the 1973 recording by The Allman Brothers Band.

"Jessica", one of the Allman Brothers' classics, has been a favorite since the 1970's, when my rock-and-roll band played it at almost every gig. "Jessica" is on the 1973 album "Brothers and Sisters," by The Allman Brothers Band, Capricorn Records CP 0111. Produced by Johnny Sandlin & The Allman Brothers Band, the album is "dedicated to a brother - Berry Oakley," their original bass player who died in a motorcycle accident near the location of Duane Allman's fatal motorcycle accident.

For the piano, the Allman Brothers brought in Georgian Chuck Leavell, who since then has played with The Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton ("UnPlugged"). This note-perfect piano transcription shows Leavell's solo in "Jessica" to be beautifully structured, containing a great section of over-the-bar-line type of phrasing, which leads into ascending and descending octave phrases, then into a section of "hammer-on" fourths, ending with an ascending broken-octave passage in unison with the rest of the band. There's lots of fun stuff in this piano solo to learn, and to learn from.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Allman Brothers Band - Jessica - Piano Solo

The Allman Brothers Band - Southbound - Piano Part without Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

When The Allman Brothers Band recorded "Southbound" in 1972 (it was released in 1973 on their Brothers and Sisters album), pianist Chuck Leavell was only 20 years old. Yet the young pianist laid down one of the most propulsive, driving piano tracks ever recorded on a rock song.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano part - all 157 measures (the 5:10 version) - with the exception of the 16-bar piano solo, which is not included. If you'd like to study how Leavell created such a wonderful piano part that drives the entire band, this is just what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Allman Brothers Band's "Southbound" on YouTube.

The Allman Brothers Band - Stormy Monday - Organ Solo - (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Stormy Monday", on the legendary 1971 album by The Allman Brothers Band, "At Fillmore East", is one of the classic recordings of this perennial 12-bar blues favorite, written in 1947 by T-Bone Walker. To add some contrast to the slow blues verses preceding it, Gregg Allman's B-3 organ solo is an up-tempo jazz waltz (179 Beats per Minute) that lasts for almost 50 seconds before the slow "Stormy Monday" blues resumes.

During these 50 seconds, Gregg Allman plays a jazzy, Jimmy Smith-influenced organ solo that takes good advantage of the Dorian mode, and throws in some fun B-3 techniques, such as holding one note while improvising around it (great way to build the tension), and repeated notes, augmented chords and seven-sharp-nine chords.

Underneath this wonderful organ solo, Berry Oakley plays some of the most creative walking-bass lines ever recorded in a 12-bar blues context. Instead of just outlining the chords, as many walking-bass lines do, Oakley uses lots of very clever and creative passing notes, sometimes in contrast to the chords played by the guitars.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire organ solo - all 48 measures. Plus, it also includes a transcription of the bass guitar line, so that the keyboardist can better understand what is going on underneath him/her in Berry Oakley's excellent part. This should also prove very helpful to bands that are working up this version of "Stormy Monday" and want it to sound exactly right.

This transcription is perfect for learning Allman's classic organ solo, and for studying his Hammond B-3 style.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen to the organ solo, just click: The Allman Brothers Band - "Stormy Monday" (organ solo)

The Animals - The House of the Rising Sun - Organ Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Recorded in just one take in 1964, The Animals' version of "The House of the Rising Sun" became one of the biggest hits in rock history, going to #1 in both the U.S.A. and the U.K. (plus Canada and Finland). Based on a sixteenth-century English folk song about a Soho brothel, it tells the story of a man's downfall in a New Orleans whorehouse.

In 1962 The Animals were formed by Alan Price, an excellent, self-trained organist, whose instrument of choice was the Vox Continental. Price's organ part on "The House of the Rising Sun" is one of rock's true classic keyboard parts. However, most keyboard players simply arpeggiate the chords, whereas Price's right hand part was more rhythmic and creative than just simple arpeggios. And his 34-second solo in the middle of the song is a textbook example of a 1960's combo-organ solo. The long version, released in the UK but not in the USA, also has a second organ solo - 30 seconds long - that comprises the Out Section.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the organ part for the entire song - the long version, all 4:29  - 172 measures long. It also includes a transcription of the Guitar part during the 8-bar Intro. If you want to play "The House of the Rising Sun" exactly as Alan Price recorded it in one take for The Animals, this is just what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "The House of the Rising Sun" on YouTube.

Artisti Uniti per L'Abruzzo - Domani 21/04.2009 - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Domani" was originally written in 2003 by Mauro Pagani. Fifteen days after the April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake 56 leading Italian musicians converged at a recording studio in Milan to record their own version of "Domani", which became the best-selling single of 2009 in Italy. The recording was the brainchild of Italian singer Jovanotti, and co-produced by Pagani and Marco Sorrentino. The 56 artists that were involved in the recording included:

Zucchero, Ligabue, Tiziano Ferro, Enrico Ruggeri, Gianni Morandi, Franco Battiato, Massimo Ranieri, Max Pezzali, Eugenio Finardi, Carmen Consoli, Francesco Renga, Roberto Vecchioni, Giuliano Palma, Elio, Vittoria Cosma, Jovanotti, Caparezza, Frankie High Energy, Gianluca, Grignani, Giuliano Sangiorgi (singer with Negramaro), Claudio Baglioni, Ron, Luca Carboni, Baustelle, Samuele Bersani, Marracash, Albano, Laura Pausini, Nek, Antonello Venditti, Jovanotti, Fibra, J-az, Roi Paci, Giorgia, Giusy Ferreri, Piero Pelu, Morgan, Mario Venuti, Dolcenera, Gianna Nannini, Elisa, Manuel Agnelli, Mango, Niccolo Fabi, Pacifico, Antonella Ruggiero, and Bluvertigo.

"Domani" is a wonderful 6:12-long classic, reminiscent of "We Are the World," the 1985 charity single by USA for Africa. The pianist chosen for the project was Eros Cristiani, who plays with beautiful sensitivity and warmth, and an excellent sense of dynamics. The piano begins the song with a soft hymn-like solo, and slowly builds in intensity as the bass guitar enters in Verse 2, and later the drums in Chorus 1,  and builds to a powerful, rhythmic rocking climax. This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano part - all 6:12 - 142 measures. If you'd like to play "Domani" exactly as it was recorded by Artisti Uniti, this transcription is what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "Domani 21/04.2009" on YouTube.


Asleep at the Wheel - Boot Scootin' Boogie - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Asleep at the Wheel is an Austin, TX-based band that specializes in country/Western-swing, of which "Boot Scootin' Boogie" is a good example. Moving along at a brisk tempo (148 BPM), it uses a shuffle rhythm characteristic of the genre. This boogie-based piano solo is a good example of how to combine the Major and minor pentatonic scales, with an emphasis on the Major pentatonic scale. Beginning with an effective use of a descending run in sixths, it quickly begins throwing in 'flips' (five in all), a couple of 'crushed' tones, and at least one broken, or 'yodeling', sixth - lots of fun piano riffs in a relatively short time.

Later in the song the piano throws in another fun riff, which incorporates yet more 'flips', thirds, and a blurring of Major/minor tonality by the use of grace notes. That riff is also included in this note-for-note transcription.

Also included is the exact Bass Guitar line that underlies both the solo and the later riff. Although the pianist does not play it on the recording, it'll just add to the effectiveness of this solo if you choose to add it to your own performance of this fun, classic Western-swing boogie solo.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen to the solo, and to the riff, click here: Asleep at the Wheel - Boot Scootin' Boogie (solo & riff)

B.B. King - The Worst Thing in My Life - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Some of B.B. King's early works, from the 1950's and 1960's, had the best piano parts of any of his recordings. "The Worst Thing in My Life', from 1964, is one of those classics. Elegantly simple in conceptualization and beautifully executed, this piano part is a model of how old-style blues was played before becoming overly commercialized in recent decades - not too many notes, but every one perfectly placed.

The two contrasting sections compliment each other perfectly. In the A Section the rhythm pattern of the 4-note chords in the Right Hand is a textbook study in how to keep the forward momentum going without getting too busy, and uses classic blues voicings. The B Section never even uses chords, opting instead for tinkly thirds and using a higher register of the keyboard.

This is a perfect piece for anyone who wants to learn how to distill a blues piano part down to its essence, perfect for learning the original rhythms and voicings of that wonderful early blues style. It fits perfectly into the rhythm section, yet is also completely satisfying to play as a piano solo.

This is an exact note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 72 measures. Play along with B.B. King using the exact same notes that his own piano player is playing.

Difficulty: Easy

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Here is B.B. King's "The Worst Thing in My Life" on YouTube.

The Babys -  Isn't It Time - 4-bar Piano Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

The Babys, an English band, released "Isn't It Time" in 1977 on their Broken Heart album. Michael Corby, keyboardist and co-founder of The Babys, played the very distinctive and catchy piano intro, which can be a little tricky to pick out. This is a note-for-note transcription of just the brief 4-bar piano intro.

Difficulty: Easy

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To listen, just click: "Isn't It Time" (4-bar Piano Intro)

The Band - Caledonia Mission - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Like "The Weight", "Caledonia Mission" was included on the very first album by The Band, the 1968 classic "Music from Big Pink". Unlike most of their other recordings, Garth Hudson did not play piano on "Caledonia Mission" - this wonderful piano track was played by John Simon, sometimes referred to as the "sixth member" of The Band for producing and playing on "Music from Big Pink", co-producing and playing on "The Band", and playing on other songs up through The Band's 1993 reunion album "Jericho".

Not only is "Caledonia Mission" a lot of fun to play, but it's a wonderful study in "white funk" that incorporates:

This is an exact, note-for-note transcription of every note played in the entire 44-measure, 3-minute song, complete with the chords included above the staff.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Band - Caledonia Mission (This is the isolated piano track of just the 3rd Chorus)

The Band - The Weight - Piano Fills (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"The Weight" is one of The Band's greatest recordings, released in 1968 on their "Music from Big Pink" album. Garth Hudson plays piano on this track, and provides the octave fills during the choruses that are the signature licks in this classic recording. This note-for-note transcription lets you see exactly those octave fills that Hudson is playing, so that you can nail them perfectly.

Even though the song is in 4/4, there are several bars throughout the song that are in 3/4, making the structure of the song a little difficult to correctly memorize unless one understands where those 3/4 bars are. The entire song - 82 measures - is mapped out in a beautifully laid-out chord chart showing those bars as well as all of the important piano licks.

Not only is "The Weight" great fun to play, but practicing Garth Hudson's octave fills will also improve your octave technique.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Band - The Weight (Chorus 1) (This is just the 1st Chorus. The transcription is the entire song.)

Barbara Higbie - Fortune Smiles - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Fortune Smiles" is a very haunting new-age recording for piano and voice, by Windham Hill pianist/singer Barbara Higbie.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part, exactly as played on Windham Hills' 1994 "Piano Sampler II" album.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Barbara Higbie's "Fortune Smiles" on YouTube.

The Beach Boys - California Girls - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

The classic Beach Boys summer anthem, "California Girls" displays Brian Wilson's songwriting genius perfectly. Using a traditional two and a half minute pop song structure, Wilson creatively chose chords that are rarely picked out correctly - especially those in the Choruses and the Out section. It is a wonderful example of 'deceptively simple', i.e., something that appears simple at first hearing, but much more complex when examined closer. These are not only Brian Wilson's original chords but also the correct chord voicings.

It's easy enough for pop/rock beginners to learn the most basic Left Hand/Right Hand coordination, and yet great fun for more experienced players - the celeste-like keyboard 'lick' during the break just before the Out section begins is worth learning the entire song for!

When I played keyboards for The Beach Boys, they themselves showed me the correct keyboard parts that they wanted performed. This is the original Beach Boys' piano part - the only completely accurate transcription available - all 71 measures of the song. The Left Hand usually is playing the bass line, so this chart includes much of the exact bass guitar part also. And you may well learn a new chord progression or two from it - it, like many of Brian WIlson's compositions, contains some really creative chord progressions. If you've been wanting to play "California Girls" exactly as it was performed by The Beach Boys, here is your chance.

Difficulty: Easy

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The Beach Boys - Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder) (Brian's Instrumental Demo) - Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Pet Sounds" is one of rock's truly classic albums, and includes some very advanced recordings by Brian Wilson at the peak of his genius. "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)" is one of Brian's most beautiful compositions, and contains some complex chord progressions which can be quite difficult to figure out. In 1997 a 4-CD compilation, "The Pet Sounds Sessions", was released, containing Brian Wilson's original piano solo demo of this remarkable composition.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Brian Wilson's original piano demo - all 2:22 of it - fifty measures total. If you ever wanted to study Brian's chords, their voicings, and play this harmonically advanced song just as Brian originally conceived it, this is your opportunity.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Beach Boys - Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder) (Brian's Instrumental Demo - 1st Section Only)


The Beach Boys - Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder) (Pet Sounds Version) - Piano (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

The "Pet Sounds" version is different from Brian's Piano Demo, in that it includes different chords and bass lines plus a completely new Instrumental Bridge,  which is where the lovely string quartet comes in. Brian's Piano Demo contains no Bridge at all, just Verses and Choruses.

The version of "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder) that appears on "Pet Sounds" has no keyboard part. However, I've carefully transcribed every note of the "Pet Sounds" version - chords, chord voicings, bass line (played by Carol Kaye), string quartet parts, etc. - and condensed them into a piano solo version. The only part that it does not contain is the lead vocal melody, making this a perfect piano accompaniment for a lead vocalist, or for anyone who just wants to be able to play the "Don't Talk" track on solo piano.

Students of The Beach Boys' songs will want both versions, in order to first study Brian's Piano Demo, and then compare it to the more evolved, final version that appears on "Pet Sounds". "Don't Talk" is harmonically one of Brian Wilson's more advanced compositions, using some very sophisticated chord progressions found in no other pop/rock music. This solo piano arrangement is the full, complete "Pet Sounds" version, perfect for studying the compositional genius of Brian Wilson at his creative peak.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the "Pet Sounds" versions of "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)" on YouTube.

The Beach Boys - God Only Knows - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Paul McCartney has said that "God Only Knows" is the best song ever written. Amazingly, it came to Brian intact, as a complete song, in about 30 minutes. A harmonically complex song, with a lot of chords and inversions, this piano arrangement has been transcribed note-for-note directly from the original Beach Boys' recording.

It's not very difficult to play, although the four-bar Instrumental Break can be challenging to learn. The Left Hand vs Right Hand coordination can be learned pretty quickly by most keyboardists.

When I toured with The Beach Boys, I played synthesizers on "God Only Knows", including beginning the song with the French Horn part. This arrangement of the original Beach Boys' piano part (played on the record by Don Randi) is the only completely accurate transcription available - all 74 measures of the song - and includes the exact bass guitar part in the Left Hand (played on the record by Carole Kaye). And you may well learn a new chord or two from it - it contains some really inspired chord progressions. If you've been wanting to play "God Only Knows" exactly as it was recorded, here it is.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To see a video of Rivers Cuomo (of "Weezer") playing and singing this transcription, click here. Rivers is one of my students. Get more info on how you, too, can improve your keyboard and musical skills with me via Skype lessons.

The Beach Boys - Good Vibrations - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1976 Brian Wilson performed "Good Vibrations" on Saturday Night Live as a piano/vocal solo. There was no band or back-up singers accompanying Brian - just him singing and playing a grand piano. This is a precise, note-for-note transcription of Brian's piano part from beginning to end.

If you've ever wanted to play this great classic, the most complex of all the Beach Boys hits, but just didn't know where to begin, this is your solution. Here are Brian's own chord voicings and rhythms - play them exactly as the composer himself does.

Here is Brian's 1976 Saturday Night Live performance on YouTube.

Difficulty: Easy

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The Beach Boys - Sail On, Sailor - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

This Beach Boys classic from their "Holland" album was the most fun piano part of all of their songs to play on-stage with them. The repetitive triplets in the right hand drive the song and sometimes change chords in anticipation of the beat, such as in the two Bridges, requiring a little more coordination and sense of rhythm than may be apparent at first hearing.

Another element that makes it such fun to play is the lush chord progression behind the lyrical hook, "Sail on, sail on, sailor" - extremely fat, lush chords, made so in part by the ingenious voicings that Brian Wilson used. You'll have every note spelled out for you, just like the Beach Boys themselves used. They taught it to me.

When I toured with The Beach Boys, on "Sail On, Sailor" I played their 9-foot Baldwin concert grand piano (yes, they carried it from concert to concert), starting the song off with the piano triplets. This is the original Beach Boys' piano part (played on the record by Daryl Dragon, better known as the Captain in the pop duo Captain and Tennille) - all 52 measures, note-for-note, beautifully laid out with chords above the staff and even tempo BPM.  If you've been wanting to play "Sail On, Sailor" exactly as it was recorded, here it is.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Beach Boys - Sail On Sailor (Track Only - Intro & Verse 1)

The Beatles - Come Together - Electric Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Come Together" was recorded by The Beatles in 1969 and released on their "Abbey Road" album. Written by John Lennon, there is some confusion as to who played the atmospheric, minor-key Electric Piano part. There is no dispute that McCartney composed the part, but some claim that Lennon played it on the recording after learning it from Paul. In an interview (Playboy magazine, December 1984) Paul has said that he himself played it.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire Electric Piano part. Although a fairly simple part, it is rarely played accurately. Here is your chance to play it exactly as Paul McCartney composed and played it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Beatles' "Come Together" on YouTube.

The Beatles - Hey Bulldog - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Hey Bulldog" was recorded by The Beatles in 1968 and released on their "Yellow Submarine" album in 1969. John Lennon was the primary writer of the the song and played piano on it, one of the few Beatles' recordings to revolve around a piano riff. Originally intended to be used in the animated film "Yellow Submarine", "Hey Bulldog" was cut from the American version but restored for the film's 1999 re-release.

John's catchy piano riff starts the song; and although the part changes in the first Verse, the entire piano track continues in the lower mid-register of the piano - a lower register than is usually used in rock piano parts.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 84 measures. If you'd like to play "Hey Bulldog" exactly as John Lennon recorded it, this is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Beatles' "Hey Bulldog" on YouTube.

The Beatles - Lady Madonna - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Paul McCartney said, "'Lady Madonna' was me sitting down at the piano trying to write a bluesy boogie-woogie thing ... It reminded me of Fats Domino for some reason, so I started singing a Fats Domino impression. It took my voice to a very odd place." And although it's not exactly in the Fats Domino style, it has indeed turned out to be one of the great piano parts in rock history.

Even though "Lady Madonna" is not boogie-woogie, the left hand is in broken octaves. And during the choruses the right hand has a nice line that moves in contrary motion to the left hand - a line that is overlooked by most pianists trying to learn the piece, as are grace notes liberally sprinkled throughout the verses, along with wonderfully effective rhythmic 'bumps'. And of course the song ends with a classic honky-tonk type of figure, the perfect coda to end an outstanding piano part.

This is a note-for-note transcription of every note in this rock/pop classic - all 61 measures. I've never seen an accurate transcription of this piece before, but here is your chance to play "Lady Madonna" exactly as Paul McCartney recorded it.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Beatles' "Lady Madonna" on YouTube.
 

The Beatles - Let It Be - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of rock's greatest classics, "Let It Be" was written by Paul McCartney alone, with no help from John Lennon, and was inspired by a dream he had about his mother, who had died when he was fourteen. He said she was the inspiration for the "Mother Mary" lyric, and that "It was great to visit with her again. I felt very blessed to have that dream. So that got me writing 'Let It Be'." He said that in the dream his mother had told him, "It will be all right, just let it be."

McCartney played the piano on the track, using a Bluthner grand. "Let It Be" is almost always on the various lists of the top 10 rock piano songs, for good reason. It is a simple, but very effective piano track. McCartney uses several pianistic devices very effectively in this track, including grace notes in the Left Hand, contributing to its churchy/gospel feel, and a classic "walk-down" at the end of every Verse. During the two instrumental Verses and subsequent Chorus after the Bridge, he expands the three-note triad voicings in the Right Hand into larger, higher four-note chords, and adds a few more interesting rhythm patterns, before returning to the simpler triad voicing for the last two Verses and Choruses.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the complete song - all 71 measures. If you'd like to play "Let It Be" just as Paul did at his Bluthner on January 31, 1969, here is your chance.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Beatles' "Let It Be" on YouTube.

The Beatles - Lovely Rita - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Lovely Rita", the Beatles' classic 1967 recording from "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band", contains a wonderful piano solo, performed by their classically-trained producer George Martin. Although a fairly brief piano transcription, only nine measures, it contains a number of fun elements: honky-tonk sixths and tremolos in both sixths and thirds, and a couple of classical runs, one a fast descending 7-note scale in tenths, and the other an even faster ascending 12-note diatonic scale that ends the solo. It's fun to learn and play George Martin's exact notes on this Beatles classic.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Beatles - Lovely Rita - Piano Solo

The Beatles - The Long and Winding Road - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"The Long and Winding Road" was the twentieth - and last - number-one single issued by The Beatles. Written and played by Paul McCartney, it was recorded in 1969, and released in 1970 on their "Let It Be" album.

Two different recordings of "The Long and Winding Road" have been released. The first, which included a large orchestra overdubbed by Phil Spector, was recorded on January 26, 1969 and released in 1970. A different recording made five days later on January 31, 1969, was issued on "Let It Be... Naked" in 2003, without any of the orchestral overdubs.

I am providing three transcriptions: the original 1970 single, the 2003 "Naked" version, and both of those together in one score.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part on the original 1970 single release - all 59 measures, the entire song. If you've had difficulty in hearing McCartney's piano part clearly through the large orchestra, this is exactly what you need to play it precisely.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Beatles' "The Long and Winding Road" (1970) on YouTube.



This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part on the stripped-down 2003 "Let It Be... Naked" version of "The Long and Winding Road" - the entire song. Although similar to the 1970 version, the piano part is not the same. And the two Bridges are in fact quite different.

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Here is The Beatles' "The Long and Winding Road" (2003 "Naked" version) on YouTube.



This is a note-for-note transcription of both piano parts for "The Long and Winding Road" in their entirety: the original 1970 version plus the 2003 "Let It Be... Naked" version. The score for the 1970 version is placed directly above the 2003 version, so that the same measures can be easily and quickly compared, one over the other. If you'd like to study, play, and compare both piano versions, this double-score is what you're looking for.

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Big Tiny Little - 12th Street Rag - Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Big Tiny Little was the honky-tonk/ragtime pianist who appeared regularly on The Lawrence Welk TV show from 1955 until 1959, when he was replaced by Jo Ann Castle. The "12th Street Rag" was written by Euday L. Bowman in 1914 when ragtime was still the leading genre of popular music, and became one of the most famous and best-selling piano rags. Bowman had been a pianist in Kansas City bordellos, and he named "12th Street Rag" after a street in the redlight district there.

In 1979 Big Tiny Little recorded the 12th Street Rag with a small ensemble, including drums, bass and banjo. This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano part - all 140 measures - for Big Tiny Little's 1979 "12th Street Rag" recording released on the album "Honky-Tonk Piano featuring Mickey Finn & Big Tiny Little" (GNP/Crescendo Records). If you'd like to play the "12th Street Rag" exactly as Big Tiny Little did in 1979, here is your chance.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, click here: Big Tiny Little - 12th Street Rag (1979)

Billy Joel - Baby Grand - Piano Part - Intro & Out Section (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Baby Grand", written by Billy Joel and released in 1987, was an ode to the piano, generally, and to his piano hero, Ray Charles, specifically. The recording, produced by the great Phil Ramone, features both men playing two pianos at the same time - with Ray Charles' piano coming out of the left stereo speaker, and Billy Joel's piano in the right stereo speaker.

Ray Charles suggested to Billy Joel that they record a song together, and this is the song that Joel wrote for the occasion. It was very intelligently recorded, with each pianist careful not to step on the other's phrases (until the Out Section). The Intro and the Out Section have no vocals, and really highlight this wonderful interplay between the two master pianists. Ray Charles starts it off with a couple of chords, then Billy Joel plays a phrase, which Ray answers, then Billy answers - and that interplay continues. Ray's amazing perfect-pitch ear allows him to emulate Billy's phrases and answer them perfectly with his own wonderful gospel/blues/jazz stylings.

This transcription only contains the Intro and the Out Section, for that is where the pianistic interplay is uninterrupted by any vocals, showing off each man's skills to best advantage. And this is arranged for solo piano, based note-for-note on the original two-piano duet. Sometimes, especially in the Out Section, both men  were playing some complex ad libs at the same time, impossible to reproduce with only two hands, so the most important - and fun to play - riffs were used in this arrangement. If you want to play the two most fun sections of "Baby Grand" as a piano solo, this is exactly what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the entire "Baby Grand" on YouTube.

Billy Joel & Ray Charles - Baby Grand - Duo Piano Parts - Intro & Out Section (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Baby Grand", the 1987 hit by Billy Joel and Ray Charles, as described above, was recorded with two pianos, one piano coming out of each stereo speaker: Ray's on the left side and Billy's on the right side. Most of the song focuses on the vocal duets, except for the Introduction and the Out Section. The wonderful Intro perfectly sets the mood of this love song for the piano, and the Out Section lets each man show off his own blues/jazz pianistic skills. During the Intro each pianist is careful not to step on each other's phrases. That's not the case in the Out Section - each man cranks up the intensity and lays down some wonderful phrases at the same time as the other one is showing off.

This transcription is a note-for-note two-piano score that reveals every note played in both the instrumental Intro and Out Sections. One grand staff for Ray Charles' piano part, and a second grand staff for Billy Joel's piano - not a note is left out. And there are some very interesting notes indeed, including an awesome black-key glissando by Ray Charles in the Out Section, preceding the very last phrase in the piece, where Ray plays a G-chord riff in counterpoint to Billy's F-blues scale riff - and these two piano masters make it all work perfectly.

If you want to study in note-for-note detail Billy Joel's and Ray Charles' wonderful duo-piano interplay, this two-piano score of the Introduction and Out Section is exactly what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the entire "Baby Grand" piano duet on YouTube.

Billy Joel - New York State of Mind - Part of the Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In November 2009 Billy Joel performed his "New York State of Mind" at the Tokyo Dome. He began the piece with a long solo piano introduction. This is not the entire Introduction but a part of it - 10 bars at the end of the Intro, just before he starts singing. In free timing, it includes some classic Billy Joel chord voicings and a fun two-handed run. This is a transcription of those 19 seconds - a nice Billy Joel piano moment.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Billy Joel's 2009 Tokyo Dome performance on YouTube. :29 through :47 is the transcribed section.

Billy Joel - Piano Man - Intro (Studio) & Solo (Live) (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1975 Billy Joel performed "Piano Man" live on "Old Grey Whistle Test", a British TV show, and played a solo that was different from his recorded version - a little bit 'jazzier', with some nice rippling 8th-note-triplet runs and octave flourishes. This is a note-for-note transcription of two important sections of "Piano Man": the brief, unaccompanied 3-bar piano Introduction from his original 1973 recording, and the 16-bar piano solo that he performed two years later live on "Old Grey Whistle Test".

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Billy Joel's 1973 "Old Grey Whistle Test" performance on YouTube: 3:18 through 3:33 is the transcribed section.

The Black Crowes - Remedy - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

The Black Crowes formed in 1989 without a keyboard player. For their first album they hired a studio musician, Chuck Leavell, to play piano and organ. The keyboard parts came out so well that the band hired their own keyboard player, Eddie Harsch. Their second album, "The Southern Harmony & Musical Companion", contained "Remedy", which reached the #1 position on the Billboard Album Tracks chart and stayed there for eleven weeks.

There is a brief, 12-bar piano solo in the song where Harsch plays some terrific rocking, rhythmic licks. This is a note-for-note transcription of this 18-second piano solo (plus the following four measures after the vocals re-enter).

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Black Crowes - Remedy - Piano Solo

Bob Dylan - Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Rainy Day Women #12 & 35" was the first track on Bob Dylan's 7th studio album, "Blonde on Blonde", released in 1966. Although the lyrics suggest that the title should have been "Everybody Must Get Stoned", Dylan realized that it would never get radio airplay with that title, and thus named it "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35".

Dylan was already working with Al Kooper, and flew from New York to Nashville to record "Blonde on Blonde" with mostly Nashville session musicians. It is not clear who played the legendary piano part on "Rainy Day Women", but to my ear it sounds like Paul Griffin. Whoever played it laid down one of rock's most recognizable and classic piano parts - a cross between the Salvation Army and honky tonk. This amazing piano part is built around tremolos in the Verses, which sound like they are simple tremolos in 6th's, but they're not - they use an ingenious voicing that gives them more body than simple 6th's would, but less than a full three-note triad. The Choruses also use similarly clever voicings that avoid full triads. Also incorporated are octave fills and some cool grace notes.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 4:36, which is 104 measures long. If you've ever been intrigued by Dylan's "Rainy Day Women", here is your chance to play it exactly as it was recorded.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "Rainy Day Women" on YouTube.

Bob Seger - Roll Me Away - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Roll Me Away" was written and released by Bob Seger in 1982 on his 12th album, "The Distance". Used in three movies, Armageddon, Mask and Reckless, it is one of Seger's greatest rock classics, and one of his own favorites, used as the opening song on his Face the Promise tour in 2006-2007, his first tour in a decade. One of the reasons "Roll Me Away" sounds so good is the stellar choice of rhythm section musicians: Roy Bittan (of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band) on piano, Waddy Wachtel on guitar, and Russ Kunkel on drums.

The piano part is classic Roy Bittan. It begins with an 8-bar Intro with the piano being the lead instrument, using subdued triads in the lower mid-register of the keyboard (the highest note being an E above middle C, with most notes below middle C), with a minimalist Left Hand part. But as the song progresses and builds, Bittan begins using full 4-note chords - both solid and arpeggiated - supported by powerful octaves in the Left Hand's bass part. He throws in his characteristic octave fills, sometimes harmonizing them by adding a third below the top note of the octave. If Bittan is one of your favorite pianists and you enjoy his work with the E Street Band, you'll love his piano track on "Roll Me Away".

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 154 measures. If you'd like to play the exact notes that Roy Bittan plays and study his style, this is exactly what you're looking for.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "Roll Me Away" on YouTube.

Bobby 'Boris' Pickett - Monster Mash - Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Monster Mash" was recorded in 1962 by Bobby 'Boris' Pickett and The Crypt-Kickers, which included 20-year-old session pianist Leon Russell. Over the years it has become the quintessential Halloween pop song. The piano is the main instrument in the rhythm section, and uses a wonderfully catchy piano riff that is almost never played exactly right.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano part - all 103 measures. If you'd like to study the way that early Leon Russell devised riffs and executed turn-arounds, or if you'd just like to play "Monster Mash" exactly as on the record, here is your chance.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "Monster Mash" on YouTube.

The Browns - The Three Bells - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1959 Jim Ed Brown and his sisters, Maxine and Bonnie, recorded "The Three Bells", a song written in 1945 in France, with English lyrics added in 1948. Telling the story about the three stages in Jimmy Brown's life, it is a warmly sung recording with an excellent 'feel' to the Choruses, due in large part to the piano, which was played by Floyd Cramer, as told to me by Jim Ed Brown himself.

However, the piano part is hard to hear because of the accompanying instruments and vocals. This is a note-for-note transcription of Floyd Cramer's entire piano part on The Browns' now-classic recording, which reached No. 1 on the Billboard pop and country charts.

Difficulty: Easy

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Here is "The Three Bells" on YouTube.

Bruce Springsteen - Because the Night - "The Promise" Version - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Bruce Springsteen and Patti Smith co-wrote the rock classic "Because the Night" in 1977. Springsteen was in the studio recording his "Darkness on the Edge of Town" album with producer Jimmy Iovine, and recorded a version of it. He wasn't happy with it, and Iovine, who was producing Smith's "Easter" album at the same time, gave a recording of it to Smith. She added some lyrics to it, and released it on "Easter", becoming the first single release from that album and rising to #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Although Springsteen would perform the song live, and released it on his "Live 1975-85" album, his 1978 studio version was never released until "The Promise" box set in November 2010.

Classic Springsteen in his prime, "Because the Night" features Roy Bittan playing his classic rock piano style on the track. Starting the song with a two-bar running 8th-note figure, almost classical in nature, the piano track contains Bittan's wonderful, powerful 4-note Right Hand chords, glissandi, a different two-bar classical-like running 8th-note figure in Verse 2, octave runs, a whole-step-up modulation three-quarters of the way through, and a strong Left Hand part, closely following Garry Tallent's bass guitar line.

If you want to study Bittan's style, and play his exact notes, you'll love this complete note-for-note transcription, which contains all 96 measures - the entire song.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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If you'd like to also have the bass guitar part, here is the piano score, just as described above, with the addition of Garry Tallent's bass guitar part:

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To listen, just click: Bruce Springsteen - Because the Night (from "The Promise" - Intro & Verse 1)

Bruce Springsteen - Born To Run - Album Version - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Born To Run" was Bruce Springsteen's very first worldwide single release, in 1975. It became a classic rock anthem, launching his legendary career. Rolling Stone considers it to be in the Top 21 of the Greatest Songs Of All Time.

Springsteen has said that although the beginning of the song was written on guitar around the opening riff, the song's writing was finished on piano. The track was recorded during a touring break in August 1974 and featured session pianist David Sancious on piano. This is the version that was the power-house radio hit for Springsteen. Beginning in June 1973 Sancious began to tour regularly with the E Street Band; and legend has it that the band took its name from the street in Belmar, New Jersey, where Sancious' mother lived, as she had allowed the band to rehearse in her home. Sancious left the E Street Band later in the same month that he recorded the track for "Born To Run".

This piano part has never been transcribed before, but here it is now, complete - all 160 measures of David Sancious' piano part, note-for-note. If you want to play Springsteen's radio smash hit with complete accuracy, here is your chance.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Bruce Springsteen - Born To Run (Album Version - Verse 1)

Bruce Springsteen - Born To Run - "Live In New York City" Version - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

When pianist David Sancious left the E Street Band in August of 1974 after recording the album version of "Born To Run", he was replaced by Roy Bittan, who has played piano for the E Street Band ever since. If you've ever been to a Springsteen concert since 1974, you've seen and heard Roy Bittan performing "Born To Run", and Bittan's piano part is quite different from Sancious' radio-hit version, right from the beginning.

Bittan replaced Sancious' intro with his own part, which follows the famous electric guitar riff, and recurs every Chorus. For other parts of the song, Bittan sometimes references a Sancious part here and there, but always with his own spin on it, and often with his hands two octaves apart, which cut through better for live shows. When Clarence Clemons' sax solo begins, Bittan's part is quite different and during the Bridge is completely different from any of Sancious' parts - often using big fat classical-concerto chord voicings in both hands for a very dramatic effect. At the end of the Bridge where the off-beat descending chromatic line occurs, an entire section is inserted that is not on the album version at all - a slow, out-of-time, ascending chromatic line, building the tension until the final Verse kicks in, leading to the strongly rocking Out Section.

The very best recording of this live version is Springsteen's double-CD, "Live in New York City" (2001). Bittan's wonderful, dramatic performance on it has been transcribed note-for-note - all 178 measures. If you've ever wanted to study Roy Bittan's wonderful, rocking style, here it is, complete with his octave runs, punchy right-hand chords, and high tinkly voicings - everything precisely notated.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Bruce Springsteen - Born To Run ('Live in NYC' Version - Verse 1)

The Cars - Bye Bye Love - Synth Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1978 The Cars released "Bye Bye Love" on their debut album. Although the song was not released as a single, it has received regular airplay ever since. Perhaps one reason is the very cool synthesizer solo played by Greg Hawkes.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Hawkes' 8-bar synth solo, which can be tricky to pick out because of the digital delay FX applied to it. This score will demystify the solo and let you play it exactly as it was recorded.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Cars' "Bye Bye Love" on YouTube (the Synth Solo starts at 2:12)

Cat Stevens - Morning Has Broken - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of rock's most beautiful piano parts was performed by Rick Wakeman - Cat Stevens' 1972 classic, "Morning Has Broken". Prior to the actual recording, Stevens heard Wakeman play something in the recording booth, a rough sketch of what would later become "Catherine Howard". Stevens told Wakeman that he liked it and wanted something similar. Wakeman told Stevens he could not as it was his piece destined for a solo album, but Stevens persuaded him to adapt his composition.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part. Play it exactly as Rick Wakeman recorded it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "Morning Has Broken" on YouTube.

Coldplay - Clocks - Piano Part (transcribed & arr. by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Released in 2002, "Clocks" is one of Coldplay's biggest hits. The entire song is piano-driven, and starts off with Chris Martin's famous piano riff that recurs throughout the song. Later in the song a different arpeggiated piano riff is introduced that leads into the Bridge. Immediately after the Bridge, the first piano riff is heard again, followed by the second piano riff, which begins the Out Section, eventually fading out. "Clocks" begins with one distinctive piano riff and ends with another.

This is a transcription of the entire song - all 169 measures. If you'd like to play "Clocks" from beginning to end, this is exactly what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "Clocks" on YouTube.

Coldplay - The Scientist - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Recorded in 2001 and released in 2002 on their "A Rush of Blood to the Head" album, "The Scientist" is perhaps Coldplay's most hauntingly-beautiful ballad. Piano-based, it begins with eight bars of only Chris Martin's piano, playing its signature 4-bar phrase twice.

The chord voicings are not the common pop/rock voicings, where usually there is a chord in the Right Hand with an octave in the Left Hand. The Left Hand in "The Scientist"  does not play octaves but usually full chords and two-note intervals in voicings that can be a little tricky to pick out. They have never been accurately transcribed before. The Right Hand part also uses some chord voicings that are not commonly found, including some Brian Wilson-influenced inner voicings using Major 9th chords and Major 6th chords.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire album-length (5:08) version - all 91 measures. If you'd like to play the haunting piano part on "The Scientist" just as Chris Martin recorded it, here is your chance to do so.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is a video of "The Scientist" on YouTube.

'Crazy' - Piano Solo by zzipizape (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the greatest songs of the 20th century, 'Crazy' has been a hit for both pop and C&W artists since Willie Nelson wrote it in 1961. Artists as wide-ranging as Patsy Cline, Linda Ronstadt, LeAnn Rimes, Elvis Costello, Julio Iglesias and Don McLean have recorded it. Nelson's favorite recorded version was that of Patsy Cline, who, ironically, absolutely hated the song upon first hearing it. It became her biggest hit.

A pianist named zzipizape has recorded and posted onto YouTube his own solo piano arrangement of 'Crazy'. This is a note-for-note transcription of zzipizape's entire recording/arrangement of 'Crazy'.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is a video of zzipizape performing his arrangement of 'Crazy' on YouTube.

Dan Fogelberg - Same Old Lang Syne - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Dan Fogelberg, one of rock's most talented writer/musicians, wrote "Same Old Lang Syne" based on a true experience that he had on Christmas Eve of 1976, and it went on to become one of pop music's most beautiful love songs. After graduating in 1969 he and his high school sweetheart had gone to different colleges, and then moved to different states, losing touch with each other. By pure coincidence seven years later they ran into each other at a convenience store in their home town, which they were both visiting for the Christmas holidays. They bought a six-pack of beer and talked in her car for two hours, and although the spark was still there, she had married. Five years later, in 1981, she heard the song on the radio that he'd written about their encounter, and although she had since divorced, kept quiet about it until after his death, concerned that it would disrupt Fogelberg's marriage. Fogelberg himself refused to reveal her identity.

On the recording Fogelberg played all the instruments except drums (Russ Kunkel) and soprano sax (Michael Brecker). His piano part is a true classic. The piano intro starts out almost like a music box, then drops down to the mid-register for the first verse, where it stays for most of the remainder. It is a long song, almost 5 and a half minutes, comprising 122 measures: an Introduction, ten Verses, three Choruses, and an Out section. The piano part sounds simpler than it is, ingeniously divided between two hands, although much of it sounds like one hand - reflecting his wonderful talent as a multi-instrumentalist.

If you'd like to learn one of pop's most beautiful love songs exactly as it was recorded and at the same time increase your knowledge of how a pop piano part can be excellently constructed and performed, "Same Old Lang Syne" is a textbook example. The intro itself is one of the most instantly recognizable piano intros in pop/rock music. Treat yourself to the only precisely accurate transcription available anywhere of Dan Fogelberg's "Same Old Lang Syne" - all 122 measures!

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the complete Dan Fogelberg's "Same Old Lang Syne" on YouTube.

Dennis Wilson - Piano Variations on Thoughts of You - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of rock's greatest tragedies is Dennis Wilson, one of the founding members of The Beach Boys - a tragedy not only because of a man's life cut short in his prime, but also because of a talent not fully appreciated during his lifetime. Although rich and famous as The Beach Boys' drummer, Dennis never felt that his real musical 'voice' had been realized. He heard music in his head that did not sound like that of his brothers, Brian and Carl. Similar to Brian, he had musical visions larger and more epic than just short pop ditties.

Recorded in 1977, "Piano Variations on Thoughts of You" was not released until twenty-five years after Dennis' death, on "Pacific Ocean Blue & Bambu - 2 CD Deluxe Legacy Edition" in 2008. An introspective three-minute (3:03) piano solo loosely referencing another of his songs, "Piano Variations" starts with gentle arpeggios, evolves through a classically-influenced Bridge, and ends ethereally with an ever-softening decrescendo to quadruple-piano (pppp) in the piano's higher registers.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire song - all 54 measures - to the very last note (which is almost impossible to hear on the recording). If you'd like to precisely re-create Dennis' sensitive performance and/or study the music of the least-appreciated Wilson brother, this is exactly what you need.

To see a customer's comment, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Dennis Wilson's "Piano Variations on Thoughts of You" on YouTube.

The Dillards - There Is a Time - Lead Sheet (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

The legendary bluegrass group, The Dillards, would occasionally perform on The Andy Griffith Show as The Darlings. On December 7, 1964 on the episode "The Darling Baby", they performed "There Is a Time" with Maggie Peterson singing the lead vocal (in the character of Charlene Darling).

This is a lead sheet transcribed note-for-note from the TV show. It contains only the melody line of the lead vocal and the chord symbols of the entire TV performance - all 65 measures.

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Here are The Dillards (aka The Darlings) performing "There Is a Time" on The Andy Griffith Show.

Dolly Parton - Sittin' on the Front Porch Swing - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

ln 1993 Dolly Parton recorded an album with Tammy Wynette and Loretta Lynn, "Honky Tonk Angeles". "Sittin' on the Front Porch Swing" was included on that album. It is not clear who the pianist is, as the album credits both Floyd Cramer and Hargus 'Pig' Robbins.

A gentle, nostalgic solo piano introduction - with classic Floyd Cramer slip-note 'licks' - sets the mood for the song. This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano part - a beautifully simple, classic C&W piano track.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Dolly Parton's "Sittin on the Front Porch Swing" on YouTube.

Dr. John - Pine Top Boogie - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Dr. John is simply one of the best piano players of all time, a true master of the New Orleans-boogie style. In 1988 he videotaped a video tutorial called "Dr. John Teaches New Orleans Piano" (released by Homespun Tapes) in which he played "Pine Top Boogie" to illustrate his legendary boogie style - his version of "Pine Top's Boogie Woogie", recorded in 1928 by Clarence 'Pine Top' Smith.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piece - all 70 measures. In a minute and fifty seconds Mac Rebennack (Dr. John's real name) shows off many of his trademark tricks: octaves, double-fisted chord tremolos, tremolos in sixths, 'flips', and swirling rhythms, all grounded by a low, growly, rhythmic bass line in the Left Hand - so low that it often goes down to the next-to-the-lowest note on a piano, low B-flat.

If you've ever wanted to see exactly what Dr. John is doing to create his 'sound', this transcription is just what you've been looking for. 

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Challenging

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To listen, just click: Dr. John - Pine Top Boogie

Duke Ellington - Black Beauty - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the greatest musical minds of the 20th century was that of Duke Ellington, pianist/arranger/composer extraordinaire. Unfortunately the Duke never made many piano solo recordings; most were orchestral. However, very early in his career, in 1928 at the age of 29, Ellington wrote and recorded one of his very best compositions, "Black Beauty", a piano solo written as a memorial to Florence Mills, one of the era's leading young entertainers who had passed away unexpectedly.

"Black Beauty" is classic stride piano, showing Duke Ellington at his pianistic best: broken Left-hand tenths, sparkling Right-hand voicings, great rhythms. Compositionally it draws from many influences, including Debussy and Ravel (who was still alive and in his prime) - Impressionist whole-tone scales - and George Gershwin - chord voicings, grace-noted flat-7th's ('Rhapsody in Blue' was only four years old) - and even Scott Joplin. The song's structure was also more complex than any song of its time, even though it is all packed into a wonderfully concise three minutes.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Duke Ellington's solo piano recording of "Black Beauty", recorded in New York City on October 1, 1928, released on the Okeh label as Okeh 8636. If you'd like to study the Duke's piano style, and play this timeless piano classic exactly as the Duke himself played it, treat yourself to a very special experience and download "Black Beauty" now.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Duke Ellington's 1928 recording of "Black Beauty" on YouTube.

Eagles - Desperado - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the Eagles' most famous songs, "Desperado" was released in 1973 on their album of the same name. The piano plays the very first notes heard - a solo piano Intro that has itself become a classic, immediately identifying the song to most listeners. And the piano remains the most important rhythm section instrument in the entire song; indeed, the other rhythm section instruments (bass, guitars & drums) don't even come in until the song is over half-way over. After the Intro, the piano continues its solo accompaniment of the voice throughout several sections. After almost a minute the string section enters and joins the solo piano, but long before the other rhythm instruments finally come in, two minutes into the three-and-a-half minute song.

So the piano carries most of the song. And although it sounds fairly simple at first listen, the piano chords - and voicings - are a little more complex than one might think. To do this classic song justice, one should perform the piano part just like The Eagles recorded it. This note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire 51-measure song will show you how to play the exact same piano notes that Glenn Frey played on the record.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Eagles - Desperado - Piano Intro

Elton John - Levon - Chord Chart & Important Piano Fills (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Elton John is one of rock's greatest pianists, and "Levon" contains some of Elton's greatest piano-playing. Recorded in 1971, the song was inspired by the founder of Elton and Bernie Taupin's favorite band at the time, The Band - Levon Helm. Jon Bon Jovi has even said that "Levon" is his favorite rock song of all time.

Yet for all its greatness, the piano part has never been accurately published. One reason, perhaps, is that after the second Verse other instruments take prominence in the mix, obscuring much of the piano part. However, the most important piano piano parts can be heard well enough to notate: the Intro, the first two Verses, the Choruses, and the beginning of the Out Section.

Taken from the original hit recording (5:22 in length) from the "Madman Across the Water" album, this transcription contains the entire song - 80 measures - mapped out in a beautifully laid-out chord chart showing all of the important piano licks and some of the string lines. When the piano is obscured by the orchestra and other instruments, such as in the Pre-Choruses, the exact piano rhythms are notated so that you can study Elton's wonderful, signature rhythms and re-create them exactly.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Elton John's "Levon" on YouTube.

Elvis Presley - I Really Don't Want To Know - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Elvis recorded "I Really Don't Want To Know" twice: in 1971 in the studio, on "Elvis Country", and again in 1977 live, on "Elvis in Concert". The pianist on the studio version, recorded in Nashville, was probably Floyd Cramer. It is certainly his style. The pianist on the June 21,1977 live version in Rapid City, South Dakota is Tony Brown, the son of a preacher who frowned on pop music. Gospel music was his early inspiration, which shows in the gospel-flavored piano on this track.

This note-for-note transcription merges the two versions, using the 4-bar piano Intro on Elvis' studio version and all the rest from the live version. So in the transcription, Floyd Cramer plays the Intro, and Tony Brown plays all the rest - the best of both worlds, pianistically. If you'd like to play "I Really Don't Want To Know" with Floyd's unique slip-note style in the Intro and then with Brown's more gospel-flavored piano, you'll love learning this transcription.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Elvis' live version of "I Really Don't Want To Know" (1977) on YouTube.

To listen to the 4-bar piano Intro, click here: Elvis - "I Really Don't Want To Know" (1971) - Intro

Engelbert Humperdinck - Am I That Easy To Forget - Piano Solo & End Tag (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Engelbert Humperdinck's 1968 recording of "Am I That Easy To Forget" had a wonderful Floyd Cramer-style piano solo, probably played by Floyd himself. And at the end of the entire song there is a very tasty Country/Blues piano flourish.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the Floyd Cramer-style 8-bar piano solo in "Am I That Easy To Forget", plus the ending piano Tag.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen to the 8-bar piano solo, click here: Engelbert Humperdinck - "Am I That Easy To Forget" (Piano Solo)

To listen to the End Tag, click here: Engelbert Humperdinck - "Am I That Easy To Forget" (End Tag)

Eric Clapton - Cocaine - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Eric Clapton has always surrounded himself with the very best musicians, often using the great Chris Stainton on keyboards. On his 2008 and 2009 concert tours Clapton used Stainton, and assigned piano solos to him on songs that didn't have a keyboard solo on the original recordings -"Cocaine" being one of them. And what a solo Stainton devised for those live performances - a two-minute, three-section tour de force!

Starting the solo with an atmospheric two-handed double-trill in fourths, he progresses into Aeolian-mode arpeggiations, which evolve into a brief machine-gun-articulate ascending/descending minor pentatonic run, ending the section with a hands-two-octaves-apart Latin break. Immediately the next section begins, an alternating-hand rhythmic pattern (playing drums on the keyboard) that transitions into a virtuoso display of Right Hand octave runs, then into Right Hand glissandi with the Left Hand continuing a rhythmic pattern even during the glissandi. That second section ends with descending grace-noted octaves and a keyboard-long descending glissando. The third and final section begins at the lowest part of the keyboard in an ascending, alternating-hand chromatic run all the way up to the top of the keyboard (and no, it's not a straight chromatic run, but does have a definite, repetitive pattern) and ending the entire solo with an extended two-hand trill. Wow! You feel like you've been on a journey when it's finally over!

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire two-minute solo - all 108 measures. If you want to re-create Chris Stainton's truly remarkable "Cocaine" solo or just to study it for its choice of notes and structure, here is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Eric Clapton - "Cocaine" (Live) on YouTube. Stainton's solo begins around 4:26.

Eric Clapton - Lay Down Sally - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Even though none of Eric Clapton's recorded versions of "Lay Down Sally" contain a piano solo, in 2011 some of his live concerts did, with no less than Chris Stainton - Joe Cocker's longtime piano man - playing the piano part. Fortunately, someone in Denmark captured it on video and posted it onto YouTube.

Stainton throws in plenty of great rock piano tricks, including 'walking sixths', hammered-on fourths, creative use of thirds, and even an ascending chromatic scale.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Chris Stainton's 40-second piano solo on "Lay Down Sally", as performed live in concert in Hernin, Denmark on June 11, 2011. Also included is the bass guitar part.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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See the YouTube video of this performance here.

Eric Clapton - San Francisco Bay Blues - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Of all the songs Eric Clapton has recorded, probably none is more 'honky-tonk' than "San Francisco Bay Blues", highlighted and made 'extra-honky' by Chuck Leavell's wonderful piano. Written and recorded by Jesse Fuller in 1954, Clapton chose it for his "Unplugged" video in 1992.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 120 measures. If you want to study how Leavell creates his honky-tonk magic, and to play it yourself exactly as he does, this is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Moderate

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See the YouTube video of this performance here.

Etta James - At Last - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"At Last" is simply one of the most beautiful romantic ballades in R&B and Pop history. Etta James' version, released in 1961, is the definitive version of this classic, originally written in 1941 by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren for the movie "Orchestra Wives". Celine Dion covered it in 2002, as did Beyonce in 2008, but no version has ever had the pure magic that Etta James' recording did (an excerpt of which was used as a Jaguar commercial in the 1990's).

The piano is very difficult to hear under the other instruments and string orchestra, but this is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part from Etta James' version. The song has some tricky, difficult-to-hear chord changes, but every one is of course notated precisely in this note-for-note transcription of the entire song - all 41 measures - including augmented chords, Major ninth chords, seven-flat-nine chords, sharp-nine chords, ninth chords, thirteenth chords, and various inversions.

And although this is not a transcription of the entire string arrangement, it does include the main string line that begins the recording before Etta's vocal enters (and ends the piece in the Out Section).

If you've ever wanted to play "At Last" but just couldn't get it to sound right - or just wanted to study the amazing chord progressions in it - here is your chance to play it exactly as Etta James recorded it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Etta James' "At Last" on YouTube.

If you want not only the piano part but also the bass guitar part (it may be an upright bass on the recording), a transcription is also available that contains the bass part note-for-note - every single bass note of the entire Etta James' recording. This transcription contains both the piano part and the bass part (three staves):

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Faces - Stay with Me - Main 2 Electric Piano Riffs (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of rock's classics, "Stay with Me" (1971) by Faces had a particularly distinctive keyboard part, an electric piano played by Ian McLagan. This is a short transcription of just the two main Right Hand electric piano riffs - about 11 seconds total - that occur at :28 and 3:56 in the song. However, they will be useful to players wanting to precisely re-create that 'sound', or to perform it in their own band.

This is short, and thus, inexpensive - $3.95.

Difficulty: Easy

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To listen, just click: "Stay with Me" - Riff 1 and Riff 2.

Floyd Cramer - Could I Have This Dance - Piano Part - Verses 1 & 2 (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Floyd Cramer was the most important Country/Pop pianist of the 20th century. After moving to Nashville in 1955 at the age of 22, Cramer revolutionized C&W piano-playing with his 'slip-note' style, which he said he got from Mother Maybelle Carter's guitar stylings. He quickly became Nashville's #1 session pianist, recording with everyone from Elvis to Roy Orbison to The Everly Brothers. "Could I Have This Dance", while not as famous as "Last Date", illustrates his wonderful slip-note style, showing in detail exactly how every embellishment was played on the recording.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the Intro and the first two Verses - the first 39 seconds of the song (20 measures). If you've been wondering exactly how Floyd gets his unique sound, this will show you how to play it yourself.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Floyd Cramer - "Could I Have This Dance" (1st 2 Verses)

Floyd Cramer - Last Date (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Floyd Cramer was the top session pianist in Nashville from 1955 until his death in 1997, recording with Elvis Presley, The Everly Brothers, Roy Orbison, and a long list of other top artists. He created the 'twangy' slip-note style that so many other pianists have tried to emulate - a style that he said was influenced by Mother Maybelle Carter, although she was a guitarist and autoharpist. In 1960 he wrote and recorded "Last Date", which became the largest hit of his own career as an artist. "Last Date" inspired a whole new generation of pianists to copy his slip-note technique.

I've transcribed the entire song and added a Left Hand part that allows the song to be performed as a solo piano piece, not requiring a rhythm section accompaniment. If you've ever wanted to study Floyd Cramer's style and really learn just how he created his unique slip-note style, this transcription/arrangement is exactly what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Floyd Cramer's "Last Date" on YouTube.

George Michael - Freedom 90 - Piano Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

George Michael released "Freedom 90" in 1990 on his Listen Without Prejudice, Vol. 1 album. After 8 bars of percussion, the piano comes in and plays a 32-bar Intro before the vocals begin. That piano part utilizes the hands in a Left-Right-Left-Right pattern very much as though the keyboardist is playing conga or bongo drums on the piano. This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire 32-bar piano Intro, including the double-glissando (in thirds).

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: George Michael - "Freedom 90" (32-bar Piano Intro)

George Winston - Cloudy This Morning - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

George Winston is simply the most talented New Age pianist/composer on the scene. The first time I saw him was on TV playing a guitar duet with the late, great Chet Atkins. When they were finished, Winston put down his guitar, went to the piano, and played an amazing New Age piece of his own. When the camera showed his hands on the keyboard, they looked absolutely terrible - very bad hand position, almost claw-like, as though he'd never had a lesson in his life. If the sound had been turned down, one would have thought that it must sound amateurish. But the sounds that came out were quite the opposite; the piano playing was terrific. Winston displayed a very high level of creativity and it was clear that he was a creative force to be respected and admired. Clearly Chet Atkins was proud to share the stage with him.

One of the things Winston is good at is creating music that is not just pretty, but goes beyond that to paint a picture - a true soundscape. And "Cloudy This Morning" does just that. Although it's not particularly easy, it's a lot of fun to play, and will take the listener - and the performer - into Winston's own colorful world - a kaleidoscope of tones.

Although some of Winston's compositions have been transcribed, "Cloudy This Morning" (from his album "Forest") has never been made available before. This note-for-note piano transcription will let your own hands recreate just what George Winston's hands must feel like as he paints a picture of a cloudy morning, and the moods that go with it. This is your opportunity to not only play his music precisely as he recorded it, but to also study it and understand better the wonderfully creative mind that conceived it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is George Winston's "Cloudy This Morning" on YouTube.

Gin Blossoms - Found Out About You - Main Guitar Riff (transcribed & arr. by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the Gin Blossoms' catchiest guitar riffs is the 4-bar phrase that starts "Found Out About You". This is an exact transcription of that guitar riff - just those four measures. If you're a keyboard player, this is what you need to double that guitar line or to devise your own accompaniment. If you're not sure how to create your own accompaniment to the guitar riff, a 4-bar piano part is also included that can be used as a starting point.

Difficulty: Easy

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To listen, just click: Gin Blossoms - "Found Out About You" (Guitar Riff)

Groundhog Day - Phil's Boogie - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In the movie, "Groundhog Day", Bill Murray's character, Phil, plays a scorching-hot boogie that amazes the crowd. Actually composed and performed by session pianist Terry Fryer, the boogie is quite a virtuoso showpiece.

Difficulty: Challenging

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To listen, just click: "Phil's Boogie" from "Groundhog Day".

Here on YouTube (the first 48 seconds) is that scene in the movie.

Guns N' Roses - Sweet Child of Mine - Piano Arrangement/Chord Chart (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

The Guns N' Roses' 1988 classic, "Sweet Child of Mine", has no piano in it. This is a simple arrangement based on the exact guitar and bass guitar notes. If you want to play "Sweet Child of Mine" in a band, or to accompany a singer, this is what you need.

The exact guitar notes that open the song, all the way up to when the vocal enters, are included in the Right Hand Part. The Left Hand is the Bass Guitar part, note-for-note. Please note that after the Intro, the Right Hand chords are represented by slashes with chord names above them, so you do need to have a working knowledge of chords and the ability to improvise. This is perfect as a "road map" of the entire song.

Here is Guns N' Roses "Sweet Child of Mine" on YouTube.

Difficulty: Moderate

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The Highwaymen - Me and Bobby McGee - Piano Solo & Riffs (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

When four legends of country music - Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson -  decided to go on tour together, they hired one of Memphis' long-time session players, Bobby Emmons, to do the job. One of the songs that featured Emmons in a piano solo was Kristofferson's "Me and Bobby McGee".

And Emmons' solo does not disappoint. Throwing in lots of thirds, and ending in a descending two-octave run, the solo is a fun, tasteful 16-bar country/rock romp.

Also included are two important piano riffs that occur earlier in the song than the solo. One riff is two bars long, and the other a three-bar riff.

This is a note-for-note transcription of all sixteen bars of Bobby Emmons' piano solo - both hands (plus the five bars of the two riffs). Here is your chance to learn and study a wonderful, well-constructed rock-a-billy piano solo.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here are The Highwaymen performing "Me & Bobby McGee" on YouTube. The piano solo is from 3:42 to 4:08 on the video. The riffs occur around 1:51 and 2:17.

The J. Geils Band - Give It to Me - Piano & Bass Parts (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

When The G. Jeils Band released "Give It to Me" in 1973, they gave pop music one of its most danceable hits, fueled by an infectuous rhythmic  2-bar piano phrase that rides atop a wonderfully-syncopated reggae bass line.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano part for the radio version - a little over three minutes long - all 90 measures. Also included is the bass guitar line, so this transcription will be very helpful for those that might be playing this song with a bass player.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The J. Geils Band performing "Give It to Me" on YouTube.

Jackson Browne - I Thought I Was a Child - Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

A first-rate songwriter, Jackson Browne is also a talented pianist, whose style is quite recognizable but not well understood among keyboard players. "I Thought I Was a Child" (from his "For Everyman" album) starts off with a nice long piano introduction that displays his classic piano sound - clangy, almost guitar-like in its use of open 4ths, suspensions, and added seconds.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano Introduction from "I Thought I Was a Child" - all 44 seconds of it. This is a wonderful chance to study Browne's piano style and play his exact notes.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Jackson Browne's "I Thought I Was a Child" on YouTube.

Jason Mraz - The Woman I Love - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

When Jason Mraz recorded "The Woman I Love" in 2012, he chose one of Los Angeles' best session keyboardists to play the acoustic piano part, Jeff Babco. The track has a terrific up, happy feeling, with a wonderful 8-bar piano solo in the middle of it.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the excellent acoustic piano solo in "The Woman I Love".

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Jason Mraz - "The Woman I Love" (Piano Solo)

The Jeff Beck Group - Going Down - Left Hand Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1972 The Jeff Beck Group released their version of the blues classic, "Going Down". The pianist was Max Middleton, who was classically-trained. His right hand parts are more easily copied than his left hand pattern, which was influenced by Jerry Lee Lewis' left hand patterns. Very few pianists play this challenging 24-bar Left Hand pattern correctly, which is difficult to pick out but necessary to play correctly to accurately capture the feel of the recording.

This note-for-note transcription does not include any Right Hand parts, but is precisely the 24-bar Left Hand pattern, which, at 175 BPM, is challenging to get up to speed, but a lot of fun to play. If you'd like to learn it, here it is, exactly as Max Middleton recorded it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the Jeff Beck Group's "Going Down" on YouTube.

Jerry Lee Lewis - Real Wild Child - Piano Part (transcribed & arr. by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Jerry Lee Lewis was never better than he was in his earliest days, a rock-and-roll dynamo that played the piano - rocked the piano - like it had never been before. He recorded three different versions of "Real Wild Child", also called "Wild One", as far back as 1958.

This version contains a classic, rocking Jerry Lee piano solo, brimming over with The Killer's extraordinary pianistic energy. Part of the solo sounds at first like he's just hitting rhythmic clusters of notes, but upon close listening, they can be notated.

This is a transcription of the entire recording - all 90 measures. If you'd like to become better at imitating Jerry Lee's unique style, learning this transcription/arrangement of "Real Wild Child" will be a good step in the right direction.

Difficulty: Challenging

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Here is Jerry Lee Lewis' "Real Wild Child" on YouTube.

Jerry Lee Lewis - She Was My Baby (He Was My Friend) - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Jerry Lee Lewis is one of the founding fathers of rock-and-roll piano-playing, and "She Was My Baby" is 'The Killer' at his honky-tonk best. Released in 1964 when his piano chops were still near their peak, this very danceable track throws in all of Jerry Lee's tricks: tremolos, single note runs, glissandos, a pumping Left Hand - plus a terrific solo.

This is a note-perfect transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 65 measures. If you'd like to rock the 'juke joint' like Jerry Lee did, here is your chance to play "She Was My Baby" exactly as he recorded it. Everything is included except the sawdust on the floor.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Medium

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Here is Jerry Lee Lewis performing "She Was My Baby" on YouTube.

Jerry Lee Lewis - That Lucky Old Sun - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the greatest rock-and-roll pianists of all time, Jerry Lee Lewis was the subject of a movie in 1989 about his life, "Great Balls of Fire", starring Dennis Quaid. For the movie soundtrack, Jerry Lee re-recorded three songs, including "That Lucky Old Sun", which features just his piano and his voice - no other instruments.

Although Jerry Lee was known for his up-tempo piano-pounding - really great rock virtuoso playing - this song is an example of the slower side of Lewis - the slow-dancing-at-the-honky-tonk side. Filled with his signature tremolos, glissandi, and bursts of scale/arpeggio runs, "That Lucky Old Sun" is 'The Killer' at his classic, slow-tempo best, complete with an instrumental Piano Solo section.

This is a note-for-note transcription of every note that Jerry Lee played in the entire song - all 73 measures, 4:36 long. If you'd like to recreate Jerry Lee's honky-tonk style, this is exactly what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Jerry Lee Lewis performing "That Lucky Old Sun" on YouTube.

Joe Cocker - Feelin' Alright (Live) - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Feelin' Alright" is one of rock's classic dance songs. If an audience is going to ever get out of their seats and dance, it will be to "Feelin' Alright". Although written by Dave Mason of Traffic, Joe Cocker's 1969 recording is the definitive version.

The following year when Cocker kicked off his Mad Dogs & Englishmen tour with two nights at Bill Graham's Fillmore East night club in New York City, the concerts were recorded and released as an album. Leon Russell was Musical Director for the tour, and played guitar on "Feelin' Alright". Chris Stainton, who'd been with Cocker since 1966, played piano on this track.

Stainton's piano part throughout the entire song draws heavily from the studio version, played by Artie Butler, but with Stainton's own ideas. His piano solo near the middle of the song resembles Butler's solo very little, except the notable use of the same classic C9 and F13 voicings in the Left Hand. Stainton has his own bag of tricks, with liberal use of octaves, including an octave run that begins on the highest C-octave on the piano and descends over four bars, using the C minor pentatonic scale, until it's in the mid-register. Another octave run, this time an ascending chromatic scale, builds the solo into the piano breakdown. At that point everything stops except the piano (and percussion), which plays eight bars of funky riffs, before the singing and other instruments resume.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Chris Stainton's 32-bar piano solo - all 45 seconds of it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Joe Cocker - "Feelin' Alright" (Live) - Piano Solo

John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band - On the Dark Side - Intro Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1984 "On the Dark Side" was propelled to the #1 spot on U.S. charts by its appearance in the movie "Eddie and The Cruisers". Overnight The Beaver Brown Band, which had been a bar band in the Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island region, had the Number One record in the country. Bobby Cotoia, the band's pianist, suddenly found his opening riff being learned, or at least attempted, by almost every aspiring young keyboardist.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part during the song's Intro - about the first minute of the song, which includes the atmospheric piano part followed by the rhythmic chords, until the vocals for the verse enter.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band - "On the Dark Side" (Intro)

John Lennon - Imagine - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

John Lennon thought that "Imagine" was as good as any song he ever wrote with The Beatles. Certainly one of the greatest rock songs ever, a true Classic, Rolling Stone considers it to be in the Top 3 of the Greatest Songs Of All Time.

The piano part - one of the most recognizable piano riffs ever conceived - was first played by John Lennon; but he wasn't completely happy with his own performance so he asked Nicky Hopkins to record over it, using the same notes, but with a more polished performance. The result is that the piano part is a bit murky and it's difficult to hear every note with precision. No sheet music has ever accurately notated it.

However, in 2003 "The Lennon Legend" DVD was released. For the audio part of the remastering of this DVD-project, instead of using the 2-track (mixed) tapes as normally used in these cases, the producers went back to the original multi-track session tapes and remixed the songs from scratch. This resulted in a much clearer piano part that can be transcribed note-perfectly. If you'd like to perform this wonderful, minimalist piano part precisely as John Lennon conceived and Nicky Hopkins performed it, here is your opportunity.

This is the piano part for the entire song - all 56 measures, note-for-note.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Easy

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To listen, just click: John Lennon - Imagine (Instrumental Version - Verse 1)

Jon England - I'll Take Manhattan (Eddy Duchin Style) - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the greatest popular pianists of the 1930's and '40's was Eddy Duchin, known for his elegant style and velvet touch. "I'll Take Manhattan" is one of the songs associated with Duchin, a version of which (played by Carmen Cavallaro) is in the biographical movie, "The Eddy Duchin Story" (1956).

As his own homage to Eddy Duchin, English pianist Jon England has recorded "I'll Take Manhattan", which incorporates a number of Duchin's pianistic techniques: rippling two-hand arpeggios, 2-octave-apart melody line, lush five-note block chords, sparkling grace notes, and others.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Jon England's "I'll Take Manhattan" in the style of Eddy Duchin. If you'd like to study the pop piano style of high society in the 30's and 40's generally, or Eddy Duchin in particular, this should prove very helpful.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Jon England performing "I'll Take Manhattan" on YouTube (from the beginning up to 1:28).


Jools Holland - Rotten Row Revisited - Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Jools Holland is an English pianist who hosts two TV shows: "Later... with Jools Holland" and "Hootenanny". A founder of the 1970's band "Squeeze", he now tours with his own band, "Jools Holland's Rhythm and Blues Orchestra". One of Holland's favorite musical genres is boogie-woogie, and he has recorded a number of songs in that style.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Holland's "Rotten Row Revisited", from his 1995 CD, "Boogie Woogie Piano" - the entire song, all nine verses. A fast (194 BPM), up-tempo piano boogie, "Rotten Row Revisited" is full of various boogie-woogie licks, including chord stabs, single-note runs, thirds, trills, and others. If you'd like to play "Rotten Row Revisited" exactly as Jools Holland recorded it, or just study a spirited 1985 version of classic boogie-woogie, this is what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Jools Holland - Rotten Row Revisited (First 3 Verses)

Kid Rock - All Summer Long - Piano Tag (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Two years before his death, Billy Powell, the original keyboardist for Lynyrd Skynyrd, played the piano part on Kid Rock's "All Summer Long". Much of the piano part on that recording was sampled from Powell's "Sweet Home Alabama" part, but he added a very brief tag onto the end of "All Summer Long". This is a note-for-note transcription of just that very brief piano tag by Billy Powell - one of the last things he recorded.

This is short, and thus, inexpensive - $3.95.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Kid Rock - All Summer Long - Piano Tag

Leon Russell - A Song for You - Piano & Baritone Horn Parts (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Leon Russell is not only one of rock-and-roll's greatest piano players, he is also one of pop/rock's very best songwriters. Released in 1970 on his very first album, "A Song for You" is one of the very best love songs ever written - touching, romantic lyrics and a great piano part. Leon combines classical techniques, such as minor key scales/chords and chromatic runs, with pop/rock piano voicings, including the tasteful use of warm, supporting bass octaves in the lowest registers of the piano keyboard. And he uses far more creative chords/harmonies than are ever published in lead sheets of this song.

This is a transcription of the piano part for the entire song - all 4:08 of it, including the wonderful solo, of course. The brass instrument (probably a baritone horn) that accompanies the piano so hauntingly is also transcribed note-for-note. If you'd like to learn how Leon Russell voices chords, and what notes he chooses in his playing/compositions, this is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Medium

Two options are available:

1) piano part only

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2) piano part plus the baritone horn part

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Here is Leon Russell performing "A Song for You" on YouTube.

Leon Russell - I Put a Spell on You - Piano Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1970 Leon Russell released his first solo album, titled "Leon Russell". One of the now-classic tracks on that album was "I Put a Spell on You", which starts off with a couple of 'false starts' that proceed into a solo piano Intro to the song. Although the Intro is only 21 seconds long, it is full of classic 'Leon' piano licks: cool runs, Left Hand octaves, and that 'Leon sound'.

This is a note-for-note transcription of just that 21-second Intro. Although brief, it is an excellent study in what makes Leon Russell's piano-playing sound like it does. If you'd like to kick off Leon's "I Put a Spell on You" exactly as he recorded it, here's your chance.

Difficulty: Medium

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Here is Leon Russell performing "I Put a Spell on You" on YouTube. The Intro is from :35 through :56.

Leon Russell - Tryin' To Stay 'Live - Piano Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Between 1967 and 1969 Leon Russell recorded the tracks for "Asylum Choir II", released in 1971. One of those tracks, "Tryin' To Stay 'Live", starts off with a 16-bar, 25-second Intro that is classic, text-book Leon Russell piano-playing: an entire series of Right-Hand octaves (plus a few chords and grace-notes) accompanied by thumping octaves in the Left Hand.

This is a note-for-note transcription of just that 16-bar Intro, and reveals exactly how Leon got that classic Leon Russell-octaves type of sound that so many other pianists have tried to copy. If you'd like to study just how Leon could construct the gospel-rock piano parts that he's famous for, this is a classic, unbeatable example of the piano master's famous style.

Difficulty: Medium

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Here is Leon Russell performing "Tryin' To Stay 'Live on YouTube. The Intro is from :05 through :30.

Liberace - Boogie Woogie - from "Here's Liberace" - Piano Solo (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Liberace became famous because he could play, with a capitol P. Possessing the technique of a classical concert pianist, he loved showing off his technical prowess, especially in that most pianistic of styles: boogie-woogie. One of his favorite boogie-woogies was one very loosely derived from Pinetop Smith's "Pinetop's Boogie". He played this showy, technically challenging boogie since the early 1950's at least, and perhaps as early as the 1940's.

This is a note-for-note accurate transcription of Liberace's "Boogie Woogie" that was recorded live at the London Palladium and released in 1980 on the album, "Here's Liberace". It was part of a three-song medley, "Jalousie/Boogie Woogie/You Made Me Love You".

To play this extroverted Liberace classic well, one must have a strong left hand capable of playing two different classic boogie-woogie left hand patterns (the left hand pattern in Verse 1 is different from the left hand pattern found in all the other verses), plus an extremely articulate and fluid right hand.

Difficulty: Challenging

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To listen to Liberace play this boogie-woogie solo, click here: Boogie Woogie (from 'Here's Liberace')

To see Liberace play a very similar version of this boogie on YouTube, click here: Boogie Woogie (from a 1969 TV show)

Liberace - Chopsticks - Piano Solo (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of Liberace's greatest show-stoppers was his virtuoso arrangement of "Chopsticks". Starting with the simple two-handed pecking that every school child knows, Liberace's "Chopsticks" proceeds through classical references to Franz Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2, to Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor, to other Liszt, then a re-statement of the original simple Chopsticks theme before ending with a dramatic, piano concerto-like descending double-octave arpeggio.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piece - all 115 measures, 9 pages, and who-knows-how-many notes - in fact, this probably contains more notes than any other transcription. Liberace's technical 'tricks' are many: shimmering 'strums' and other embellishments in the higher registers, elegant 'society' two-handed chord voicings, lightning-fast octaves, blazing 16th notes (178 BPM), lots of arpeggios that could be played with only the Right Hand but are instead played with both hands alternating, and other wonderful techniques - all packed into two and a half amazing Liberace minutes.

This is your chance to learn the most amazing arrangement of Chopsticks ever, precisely as Liberace himself played it.

Difficulty: Challenging

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To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

To see Liberace play this exact version of "Chopsticks" on YouTube, click here.

Little Feat - Willin' - Piano Solo & End Run (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Bill Payne, co-founder in 1969 of Little Feat, is one of the most respected session players in the business. Born with perfect pitch and possessing excellent rhythm and technique, his solos are consistently done with taste and precision. His piano solo in "Willin'" is a textbook example of his keyboard artistry.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Bill Payne's piano solo in Little Feat's "Willin" from their 1972 album "Sailin' Shoes". Also included are four different piano 'riffs' that occur during the song, including the run at the very end. If you'd like to study and play a beautifully-constructed solo from a master, this is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Little Feat - "Willin" (Piano Solo)

Lyle Lovett - I've Been to Memphis - Piano Solo Sections (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"I've Been to Memphis" was released in 1992 on Lyle Lovett's "Joshua Judges Ruth", and contains one of the most remarkable rock/funk/R&B piano tracks ever recorded. The song is heavily structured around the piano, starting and ending with long stretches of solo piano, plus a piano solo in the middle - and 'solo' as in everything else drops out except the piano: really solo.

Cleanly and virtuosically played by Matt Rollings, these three solo piano sections total about 95 seconds in a style that's a mix of Bill Payne ('Little Feat') and Richard Tee. Highly rhythmic and harmonically inventive, each section gets more complex - and difficult - than the preceding one.

This is a note-for-note transcription of all three solo piano sections in "I've Been to Memphis" - a chance to study and play an exceptional track exactly as it was recorded.

Difficulty: Challenging

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To listen, just click: Lyle Lovett - "I've Been to Memphis" (3 Solo Piano Sections)

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Call Me the Breeze - Piano Solo & End Run (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

This is another great example of Billy Powell's Southern-boogie-rock style at its best. A little over a minute in length and the equivalent of two full verses, the piano solo, from their "Second Helping" album, is packed full of Powell's pianistic tricks: streams of fast, high, filigree single notes, two-handed glissandos, across-the-barline phrasings, tremolos, hammered-on fourths - and all at the very rapid clip of 194 BPM.

Also included in this precise note-for-note transcription is the bass guitar line that supports the wonderful, flashy piano solo. Although it's meant only as a guide as to what the bass is playing during the solo, some adventurous pianists may want to actually play the bass line in the Left Hand while the notes are flying in the Right Hand solo. And some bass players may just want to double-check that they are in fact playing exactly the bass line that Leon Wilkeson recorded.

At the very end Powell plays a wonderful run just to add a cherry on top of this fun, musical sundae. That end run is also included here. The "Call Me the Breeze" solo and end run have never been transcribed before, so take advantage of this opportunity to study exactly how it was played by one of rock's greatest pianists.

To see customers' comments about this transcription, click here and here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Lynyrd Skynyrd - Call Me the Breeze - Piano Solo & End Run

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Call Me the Breeze (Live) - 1st 3 Verses - Piano (transcr. by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In addition to their studio recording of "Call Me the Breeze," Lynyrd Skynyrd also released a 'Live' version on their 1976 album, "One More from the Road". This is a transcription of Billy Powell's wonderful, 'swinging' piano part during the Verses/Choruses. He uses essentially the same piano part on both the Live and the Studio versions - a terrific, driving, rhythmic pattern divided between the hands, similar to a conga- or bongo-drum style. Powell is essentially playing drum paradiddles on the piano keyboard.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the Intro and first three Verses - more than enough to learn Billy Powell's piano pattern, which is repeated throughout the song. This provides you with everything you need to play the song exactly as Billy himself did, except for the solo.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Lynyrd Skynyrd - "Call Me the Breeze" (Live) - Verse

Lynyrd Skynyrd - I Know a Little - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Billy Powell's piano solo in "I Know a Little" is a terrific study in fast single-note lines. The song flies along at 200 BPM (Beats Per Minute); and although the piano solo is only about 15 seconds long, Powell manages to squeeze in 139 Right Hand notes, without any chords and not counting the glissando! Although it sounds impossible, that is about 9 notes per second in just his Right Hand!

This solo can be a challenge to get up to speed, but like "Sweet Home Alabama" it's great fun to play Billy Powell's exact notes.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Lynyrd Skynyrd - I Know a Little - Piano Solo

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Poison Whiskey - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Billy Powell's piano solo in "Poison Whiskey" - from Lynyrd Skynyrd's very first album - is full of Powell's bag of tricks: tremolos. hammered-fourths, fast 32nd-note runs, left hand crossing over the right hand, and others.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Powell's 13-bar solo in "Poison Whiskey". If you'd like to study the style of the late, great Billy Powell, this is an excellent chance to learn his licks precisely.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Lynyrd Skynyrd - Poison Whiskey - Piano Solo

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Simple Man - Intro - Arranged for Piano Solo (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Simple Man is one of Lynyrd Skynyrd's greatest songs - a true classic. The three-chord progression was written by Gary Rossington (the only remaining original member of the band), and the words were written by Ronnie Van Zant. Shortly after Van Zant's grandmother and Rossington's mother passed away, they got together in Van Zant's apartment and in about an hour they wrote this song about advice their mothers had given them. Current lead singer Johnny Van Zant has said that it's one of his favorite songs to sing.

The intro is hauntingly beautiful and sets the mood perfectly for the entire song. Beginning with an arpeggiated 16-note figure on just a solo electric guitar, the bass enters in measure three and plays a counterpoint line for four measures. In measure seven the bass increases the counterpoint to an almost Bach-like counter-line to the continued guitar arpeggios, setting the stage perfectly for the vocal entrance in measure nine.

There is no piano part at all in the original recording. But when played on piano, the guitar and bass parts create an almost classical sound - beautiful in its own right, and completely capable of standing alone with no other accompaniment. This piano arrangement is a note-for-note transcription of those guitar and bass parts during the Intro. If you're a guitarist or a bass player, this transcription can help you, too, by showing you the exact notes played on the original recording. If you're a keyboard player, you'll be pleasantly surprised at how wonderful this Lynyrd Skynyrd classic can sound on your piano or organ.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Lynyrd Skynyrd - Simple Man - Intro (Arranged for Piano Solo)

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Sweet Home Alabama - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the great piano solos in rock music is Billy Powell's solo in the Out Section of "Sweet Home Alabama", a wonderful study in sixths, including 'yodeling sixths' (in the key of C, a 'yodeling sixth' would be, from lowest note to highest: D-sharp, E, and C). And although the solo feels wonderful, Powell sometimes plays a bit loose with the timing, not always being metronomically precise, thus making it challenging to exactly notate all the rhythmic subtleties.

This solo is rhythmically challenging as well as finger-wise, but it's great fun to play Billy Powell's exact notes.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Lynyrd Skynyrd - Sweet Home Alabama - Piano Solo

Lynyrd Skynyrd - T for Texas - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"T for Texas" is Billy Powel playing live, from Lynyrd Skynyrd's first live album, "One More from the Road" - and not only live but also lively! This song blazes away at the speedy tempo of 226 BPM, and uses lots of three-note tremolos, octaves, and broken octaves, with a glissando thrown in for good measure.

This is a note-for-note transcription of all 40 measures - about 36 smokin' seconds - of Billy Powell's piano solo in "T for Texas". You'll love playing this one.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click : Lynyrd Skynyrd - T for Texas - Piano Solo

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Tuesday's Gone - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Tuesday's Gone" was recorded in 1973 and released on Lynyrd Skynyrd's first album, "(pronounced 'lĕh-'nérd 'skin-'nérd)", produced by Al Kooper. The lyrics are about a relationship that has ended because of the stresses of constant touring. Billy Powell, their classically-trained pianist who had majored in college in Music Theory, composed and played a wonderful 39-second solo that then evolves into a string-and-piano dialogue that lasts for an additional 37 seconds.

Powell's solo incorporates some classical elements: a flowing, arpeggiated Left Hand part in the style of the Romantic era, and Right Hand scale runs and broken chords reminiscent of Mozart's Classical era style, along with Beethoven-style octaves in the String Section part. Because of the flowing, supportive Left Hand part, this solo sounds great even when played alone, without a rhythm section.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Billy Powell's piano solo, plus the piano part that continues under the string orchestra's lead. If you enjoy Billy Powell's piano style, you'll love learning his classic solo from "Tuesday's Gone" exactly as he played it.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Lynyrd Skynyrd - Tuesday's Gone - Piano Solo

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Workin' - Organ Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Workin'" (also known as "Workin' Man") is the first track on Lynyrd Skynyrd's tenth studio album, "Edge of Forever", recorded in 1999. The Hammond B-3 organ part was played by original member Billy Powell. A driving, classic Southern boogie/rock song sung by Johnny Van Zant, "Workin'" is primarily driven by the guitars, with Powell's organ part remaining in the background, and consisting of only chords and occasional palm glissandos.

This transcription of the entire song - all 127 measures - is not a literal transcription of the organ part, but is similar to a Master Rhythm chart and will enable an organist to play the song even better than just the organ chords would allow. This chart contains not only all the chords and the rhythms of those chord changes, but it also contains a note-for-note transcription of the main guitar parts. These are included so that an organist can play some or all of those parts along with the guitarist to make the organ part more interesting than just chords alone.

Also included are Performance Notes suggesting techniques to improve upon the recorded organ part, e.g., pedal tones to make the Out Section more exciting, and how and where to play "power chords" (open fifths where the third of the chord is omitted).

If you're a keyboard player who wants to play this song but doesn't know how to construct an organ part that's perfect for this guitar-driven Lynyrd Skynyrd classic, this is exactly what you need.

To see a customer's comment about this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Workin'" on YouTube.

Manfred Mann - Blinded by the Light - Organ & Bass Parts (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1977 Manfred Mann's Earth Band had a No. 1 hit with "Blinded by the Light", written by Bruce Springsteen. It was included on their 1976 album, "Roaring Silence", and featured Manfred Mann playing keyboards and Colin Pattenden on bass guitar.

The opening organ lick is a classic, although few players get the exact chord voicings correct. This transcription includes not only that classic organ riff, but the entire organ part in the Intro, 1st Chorus, 1st Verse, and 1st Pre-Chorus - all precisely as recorded by Manfred Mann himself on keyboards. This transcription ends after those four main sections, and it includes the first 47 bars of the song.

The exact bass guitar part for those sections is also included in this note-for-note transcription. Mann is playing nothing with his left-hand, so if you want to play the organ part on a piano or electric piano (or even organ for that matter), this bass part will help it to sound more complete. And if you're a bass player, this precise transcription of the bass part will let you sound just like the recording, complete with the bass slides.

If you're a keyboard player and have wanted to perform Manfred Mann's classic opening riff exactly as he recorded it, this transcription will let you do it.

Difficulty: Easy

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To listen, just click: Manfred Mann's Earth Band - Blinded by the Light (Intro, 1st Chorus, 1st Verse, and 1st Pre-Chorus)

Michael Jackson - Earth Song - Piano Part (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Written in a hotel room in Austria, and released in 1995 on "HIStory", "Earth Song" was Michael Jackson's attempt to raise the consciousness of the world regarding the environment and animal welfare. He purposefully kept the melody simple, in a way that many different cultures around the world could relate to and sing.

A solo piano begins "Earth Song", and is soon covered by other instruments and Andrae Crouch's Choir. This is a simple piano part for the entire song - all 89 measures. The piano part is note-for-note accurate until the piano is completely covered by other instruments and the large choir. From that point on, the piano continues in exactly a logical extension of what the pianist might have played. The Left Hand always closely follows the bass line, just as the studio pianist would have done.

If you'd like to perform the piano part for "Earth Song" just as originally recorded, this is perfect for you.

Difficulty: Easy

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Here is Michael Jackson's "Earth Song" on YouTube.

The Marshall Tucker Band - Stay in the Country - Organ Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Stay in the Country" was released in 1990 on The Marshall Tucker Band's 15th album, "Southern Spirit". One of the highlights of the song is Don Cameron's excellently constructed Hammond B-3 solo. Cameron, who played keyboards on three MTB albums, including "Still Smokin'" (1992) and "Walk Outside the Lines" (1993), packs a lot into the solo, including classic B-3 techniques such as holding a note like a pedal tone to build tension while playing other notes around it, quick flat-fingered glissandi used like grace notes, and perfect fourths for power. The chord progression underpinning this solo is D, A minor, C and G; and Cameron's choice of notes is very creative, especially over the C chord.

The exact bass guitar line is also included in this note-for-note transcription of the organ solo.

If you'd like to learn how to play better organ solos, this one is a good example to study.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen to the organ solo, click here: The Marshall Tucker Band - "Stay in the Country" (organ solo)


Pat Benatar - Looking for a Stranger - Organ Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Looking for a Stranger" was released in 1982 on Pat Benatar's fourth album, "Get Nervous", her first album to use Charles Giordano on keyboards. From Brooklyn, New York, Giordano played on Bruce Springsteen's 2006 album, "We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions", and in 2008 became the newest member of the E Street Band, after the death of Springsteen's longtime organist Danny Federici.

The organ part in "Looking for a Stranger" is a wonderful, rhythmic, bouncy track that uses several classic rock/pop organ techniques: full-palm glissandi (that Billy Preston pioneered twenty years earlier), rhythmic hand 'slaps' (effectively used by Jon Lord on Deep Purple's "Hush"), a classic Hammond percussion setting during the Verses, and clever pop chord substitutions (A minor over C and B minor over D, in the key of G).

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire song - all 140 measures. If you'd like to study how one of rock's best organists has constructed and recorded an outstanding keyboard part, and learn how to play it yourself, this transcription is exactly what you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Pat Benatar - Looking for a Stranger (Intro, 1st Verse & 1st Chorus)

Paul McCartney - Maybe I'm Amazed - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Maybe I'm Amazed" was written in 1969 by Paul McCartney shortly before the breakup of The Beatles, and was released in 1970 on his first solo album, "McCartney". Later, in 1977, his band, "Wings", released a single of a live performance of the song from the band's 1976 tour of America, which became a top-ten hit in the United States. This is a transcription of the 1970 studio version.

Although most people don't think of McCartney as being a great piano player, he certainly has recorded some outstanding piano parts: Lady Madonna, Let It Be, and this song. In fact, on Maybe I'm Amazed he played all the instruments: guitars, drums, organ and piano. The piano part includes lots of pianistic goodies: gospel-influenced grace notes, creative use of inversions, chromatic runs, effective dynamics, and unusual chord voicings (sometimes adding a minor third into a Major chord). If you want to study Paul McCartney's piano style, this is an excellent example.

This is a note-for-note transcription of piano part for the entire song - all 73 measures - 3:49 in length. A little of the Hammond B-3 organ part is also included (in the third Chorus). If you want to play "Maybe I'm Amazed" precisely as Paul McCartney recorded it, this will show you how.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Paul McCartney's "Maybe I'm Amazed" on YouTube.

Procol Harum - A Whiter Shade of Pale - Organ Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the greatest Hammond organ parts ever recorded is Matthew Fisher's Bach-influenced performance on "A Whiter Shade of Pale". In 2003 Procol Harum performed an even longer, absolutely terrific version in their "Live at the Union Chapel" concert. The original recording was 4:03 in length; the "Live at the Union Chapel" performance is 7:02, three minutes longer! Matthew Fisher plays not only his classic original parts, but adds about three minutes of equally awesome new material!

If you'd like to have all the intricacies of Matthew Fisher's organ parts revealed to you, so that you can study them, learn them, and perform them yourself exactly as he does, this note-for-note transcription of both hands - every organ note - is your solution. It's really an amazing organ part - all 123 measures!.

To see a customer's comment on this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Procol Harum's 2003 "Live at the Union Chapel" performance on YouTube.

Ray Charles - What'd I Say - Electric Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1959 Ray Charles recorded one of the classic keyboard parts  - the Wurlitzer electric piano part on his "What'd I Say". He had improvised it - a 12-bar blues progression - on-the-spot in December 1958 to fill time at the end of a concert, and the crowd went wild. He started performing it at subsequent concerts, always with overwhelming audience responses. By February Tom Dowd had engineered it on Atlantic Records' new 8-track recorder, and the rest is R&B and rock-and-roll history.

Ray Charles' Wurlitzer electric piano starts the song, playing all 12-bars of the intro with just a very catchy, rhythmic single line (although played with two hands). Then at the beginning of Verse 1 the rhythm section comes in and he changes the piano part to a rhythmic pattern of thirds and single notes, while his left hand is helping to accent the "2&" push - the pattern that continues throughout the song.

The second Verse starts with a piano solo 4-bar breakdown, then the piano resumes the same pattern established in Verse 1. Ray begins singing in Verse 3.

Since the first two Verses are instrumental and define exactly what the piano will continue to play throughout the rest of the song, there is no need to transcribe more. This note-for-note transcription ends when the vocal comes in at the beginning of Verse 3.

Although performed by many bands over the years, the piano part is almost never played correctly. The 12-bar intro is relatively easy to pick out, but after that no one ever gets the Wurlitzer electric piano part exactly right. Here it is, note-for-note.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Ray Charles - What'd I Say (Intro, Verses 1&2)

Ray Charles - Sweet Sixteen Bars - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1957 Ray Charles recorded one of the greatest slow gospel-blues instrumentals ever, "Sweet Sixteen Bars", a long (4:07), completely instrumental performance of wall-to-wall Ray Charles' piano.

The sparse instrumentation of only piano, bass and drums allows Ray's piano to stand out and shine, with no distractions. There are no vocals whatsoever, and no other solos - no bass solo, no drum solo - only the genius himself transforming his piano into a slow acoustic piano sermon, speaking from his very soul.

And slow it is - Not to get too technical, but the piece is in 6/4, which by definition contains two beats per measure, each beat subdivided into three quarter notes. His tempo begins at a very slow 36 BPM and actually slows down further over the course of the four minutes until it reaches a molasses-slow tempo of 31 BPM!

If you want to study Ray Charles' amazing gospel-blues piano style, there is no better recording than this classic.

To see customers' comments on this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Ray's 1957 performance on YouTube.

Ricky Skaggs - Country Boy - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1984 Ricky Skaggs released his sixth studio album, "Country Boy". The title track was a #1 country music hit in 1985, and contains some very virtuosic instrumental solos - the piano solo is smokin'! Although only 15 seconds long, the piano solo blazes away at 167 BPM (Beats Per Minute) with a steady, machine-gun stream of 16th notes.

The pianist incorporates lots of showy pianistic techniques: repeated notes, 'yodeling' sixths, ragtime flourishes, ascending octaves - a total of 172 notes in the right hand alone - that is averaging almost 12 notes every second!

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire 10-bar piano solo - a textbook study in flashy country/bluegrass piano.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Ricky Skaggs - "Country Boy" (Piano Solo)

Rod Stewart - Handbags and Gladrags - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Handbags and Gladrags" contains the best piano part of any Rod Stewart recording. Played by the songwriter himself, Mike D'Abo, the piano part is a true classic of late 1960's rock. D'Abo, who was lead singer for Manfred Mann ("Mighty Quinn", etc.), not only played the piano part on Rod Stewart's recording, but he also wrote the lovely oboe/French horn/string section arrangement.

I arranged and conducted "Handbags and Gladrags" for all of Rod Stewart's live "Unplugged" concerts - about 200 around the world, from Wembley Stadium to the palace of the Sultan of Brunei to Madison Square Garden.

This is a note-for-note transcription of every single note of the entire piano part - all 84 measures, the complete song - the long 4:26 version that contains the instrumental seven-bar piano coda stuck onto the end.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click Rod Stewart - "Handbags and Gladrags"

The Rolling Stones - 2120 South Michigan Avenue - Organ Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

If you want to hear one of the giants of rock-and-roll keyboards, "2120 South Michigan Avenue" is not a bad place to start. Ian Stewart not only played the Hammond B-3 organ part for this track, plus keyboards on many other of The Stones' recordings, but he is also credited by Keith Richards as being the founder of The Rolling Stones. Stewart was a very strong boogie-woogie player whose favorite pianists were Albert Ammons, Pete Johnson, and Meade 'Lux' Lewis - the three boogie-woogie titans that heavily influenced his own playing.

"2120 South Michigan Avenue" is a three-part jam session, with the organ taking the lead for the first third, then Brian Jones' harmonica for the second third, and Keith Richard's guitar solo for the last third. The organ part is a low- to mid-register growly, dirty-sounding Hammond B-3 that not only displays great licks during the organ solo that comprises the first third of the piece, but also has great licks while backing up the harmonica and guitar solos. Particularly, Stewart's use is 6th's is one of the most creative of any rock instrumental.

And all the licks are there, everyone of them. This is a complete, note-for-note transcription of the entire organ part, the long version - all 3:38 of it - 133 measures. If you'd like to study and play one of the classic Ian Stewart organ parts, this is exactly what you're looking for.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Rolling Stones' "2120 South Michigan Avenue" on YouTube.

The Rolling Stones - Cool, Calm and Collected - Intro & 1st Two Verses - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Cool, Calm and Collected" was released in 1967 on The Rolling Stones' "Between the Buttons" album, and featured a remarkable barrelhouse/ragtime piano track played by Jack Nitzsche, recorded in November 1966. A remarkably talented musician, Nitzsche wrote pop songs, "Needles and Pins", "Up Where We Belong" (for which he won an Academy Award for Best Song), arranged a number of pop/rock hits, including "River Deep and Mountain High" by Ike & Tina Turner and the choral arrangement for The Rolling Stones' "You Can't Always Get What You Want", and also composed movie scores, including those for "The Exorcist" and "One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest".

Nitzsche's piano part in "Cool, Calm and Collected" starts the song out with a rollicking barrelhouse piano solo, with the Left Hand full of octaves descending into the lowest registers of the piano while the Right Hand has fun with ragtime-influenced rhythms and voicings. When the vocals enter in the First Verse, the Right Hand piano voicings change to fistfuls of octaves with the Left Hand thumping away in the low registers. There is even a strong reference to Jerry Lee Lewis's style in the first two measures of the Second Verse before resuming an exotic ragtime flavor.

The Rolling Stones used a number of pianists over the years, including Ian Stewart and Nicky Hopkins, but few of their recordings display such a wonderful, eclectic piano part as does "Cool, Calm and Collected". This is a note-for-note transcription of the Intro and first two verses of this early Rolling Stones classic (there is no piano part in the Choruses).

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Rolling Stones - Cool, Calm and Collected (Intro & 1st two Verses)

The Rolling Stones (Ian Stewart) - Key to the Highway - Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Ian Stewart, a wonderful boogie-woogie pianist, was the founder of The Rolling Stones, as explained by Keith Richards in his 2010 autobiography, Life: "Ian Stewart. I'm still working for him. To me the Rolling Stones is his band. Without his knowledge and organisation ... we'd be nowhere."

When Stewart died unexpectedly in 1985 shortly after the end of recording The Rolling Stones' "Dirty Work" album, an untitled, hidden, uncredited eleventh track was included on the album. That track, the 33-second "Key to the Highway", is the only solo piano track of his of which I'm aware.

Recorded in 1964 at Chess Studios in Chicago when Stewart was 26 years old, it was never released until the "Dirty Work" album in 1986.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire track (including all of the fade-out) - a wonderful boogie-woogie piano solo that draws very heavily from the late-1930's and early-1940's styles of Pete Johnson, Albert Ammons, and Meade "Lux" Lewis, which were Ian Stewart's favorites.

If you love boogie-woogie, and would like to play Ian Stewart's only recorded solo piano piece exactly as he recorded it, here is your chance.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: The Rolling Stones - "Key to the Highway"

The Rolling Stones - She's a Rainbow - Piano Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

When The Rolling Stones recorded "She's a Rainbow" in 1967 for their album Their Satanic Majesties Request, 23-year-old session pianist Nicky Hopkins was to lay down one of rock's most classic, enduring piano parts - an almost Mozarteanly-graceful classically-influenced phrase.

Hopkins' 8-bar phrase shows up four times during the song, each time slightly different. This is a note-for-note transcription of the very first 8-bars - Hopkins' first and most defining statement of this now-famous piano phrase. If you'd like to learn this classic piano phrase exactly as Nicky Hopkins recorded it, including the difficult-to-pick-out Left Hand part, this is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is The Rolling Stones' "She's a Rainbow" on YouTube (this Piano Intro is the first 18 seconds of the video)

Santana - Evil Ways - Organ Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

'Evil Ways' is one of Santana's biggest hits, appearing on his 1969 album, "Santana". The organ solo, one of the most famous B-3 solos ever recorded, was performed by Gregg Rolie, who later founded "Journey".

Most keyboardists know that the solo starts on the 9th (an 'A' in the key of G minor), but rarely get it right after that. This is a note-for-note transcription of Gregg Rolie's classic organ solo on Santana's 'Evil Ways' - about a minute long. Now you can play it exactly as Rolie does on Santana's hit recording.

To see a customer's comment on this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Santana - 'Evil Ways' (Organ Solo)

Santana - Smooth - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of Santana's biggest hits, "Smooth" had a scorching-hot rhythm track, with Chester Thompson's wonderful piano part a vital element. Before joining Santana, Thompson played keyboards for Tower of Power.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire song - all 145 measures. If you'd like to play the piano part for "Smooth" exactly as it is on the original studio recording, this is perfect for you.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the video of "Smooth" on YouTube.

Saving Mr. Banks - Richard Sherman demos from "Mary Poppins"

The new Disney movie "Saving Mr. Banks" is about the making of the 1961 movie musical classic, "Mary Poppins". The composer of the songs in "Mary Poppins" was Richard Sherman, who is still alive and well and living in Beverly Hills. In the new (2013) movie "Saving Mr. Banks," actor/musician Jason Schwartzman plays the part of composer Richard Sherman. To authentically recreate the role of Sherman, Jason Schwartzman was given the original demo recordings from 1959 and 1960 from the Disney vaults to study. Disney hired me to transcribe those Richard Sherman piano demos note-for-note so that Jason could play them exactly as Sherman himself had played them during the pre-production  of "Mary Poppins".

Jason described the process in an interview:

I gave those demos to my piano teacher — he’s this guy Elmo Peeler, he’s the greatest.  He sat down for days and days and days and listened to some very crude recordings — at times — and transcribed all of the music as it would’ve been played in 1961 as opposed to ’66 or ’65.  I learned all the songs in that style, so they’re a bit more raw and they’re voiced differently. (The entire interview can be read here on Collider.com.)
 

I gave those demos to my piano teacher—he’s this guy Elmo Peeler, he’s the greatest.  

He sat down for days and days and days and listened to some very crude recordings—at times—and transcribed all of the music as it would’ve been played in 1961 as opposed to ’66 or ’65.  I learned all the songs in that style, so they’re a bit more raw and they’re voiced differently.


Read more at http://collider.com/jason-schwartzman-saving-mr-banks-interview/#i864PsizCqW9gQ4B.99

These are my note-for-note transcriptions of Richard Sherman playing his own wonderful, now-classic songs from the 1961 Disney classic, "Mary Poppins". In "Saving Mr. Banks" Jason Schwartzman plays only small portions of these songs - brief, tantalizing snippets. If you'd like to play the full versions of these songs precisely the way that Sherman conceived them and played them himself, this is your opportunity to do so.

A Man Has Dreams  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.
A Spoonful of Sugar  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.
Chim Chim Cher-ee (Re-Harmonized Version - only 8 bars)  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.
Chim Chim Cher-ee (Slavic Version)  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.
Feed the Birds (Tuppence)  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.
Fidelity Fiduciary Bank  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.
Let's Go Fly a Kite  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.
The Perfect Nanny  Add to Cart  - To listen to a MIDI file of this transcription, click here.

Sopwith Camel - Hello, Hello - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Sopwith Camel, remembered as part of the San Francisco psychedelic rock music scene of the late 1960's, was the second San Francisco-based band to be signed by a major record company, right after Jefferson Airplane and just before the Grateful Dead. And they were the very first San Francisco-based band to have a hit record -  "Hello, Hello", in January 1967. Their producer, Erik Jacobsen, also produced The Lovin' Spoonful, and later Norm Greenbaum's "Spirit in the Sky". Although they disbanded after less than two years, during their short life they set attendance records that surpassed such groups as the Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead and Quicksilver Messenger Service.

Founding member Terry MacNeil composed "Hello, Hello" and played one of rock's greatest tack piano parts on it - a wonderful ragtime/vaudeville/honky-tonk track that he created in the studio in only one night. The intro was a loose translation of a song MacNeil had learned on guitar, Chet Atkins' "Trambone". The boom-chuck Left Hand part was influenced by MacNeil's mother's piano style, herself an excellent pianist from an earlier era. The classic tack piano track is a textbook study in honky-tonk/vaudeville piano techniques, incorporating tremolos, minimalistic Right Hand & Left Hand voicings rarely playing more than two-notes at the time, and ragtime/honky-tonk rhythms.

This is a note-for-note precise transcription of the tack piano part for the entire song - all 79 measures. If you'd like to recreate a classic 1960's flower-power song exactly as it was played on the record, and study a textbook-perfect tack piano track at the same time, here is your chance.

To see a comment about this transcription from the original pianist that recorded the track, click here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen to the first part of the song, click here: "Hello, Hello" (Intro, Chorus & Verse only)

Steppenwolf - Magic Carpet Ride (Live) - Organ Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Magic Carpet Ride", a true rock classic, was Steppenwolf's second-biggest hit (behind "Born To Be Wild"), released in 1968 on their album "The Second". The studio version does not have an organ solo for an Intro. However, Steppenwolf's later live performances do begin the song with a flashy, gothic B-3 Hammond organ solo by Michael Wilk, using free-timing, palm glissandi, and some fun runs using the Dorian mode.

This note-for-note transcription starts at the very beginning of the piece (a low-pitched palm glissando), and continues through the entire Intro (which is an organ solo), and then ends right after the vocal enters at Verse 1 - about 49 seconds into the song. In addition to the entire organ Intro, the main 2-bar pattern that kicks off the first verse is also included.

If you'd like to play this rock classic exactly as Steppenwolf themselves perform it - or just to study how Michael Wilks constructed this wonderful, virtuosic B-3 solo - here's your chance.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the video of this Live performance of "Magic Carpet Ride" by Steppenwolf on YouTube.

Supertramp - School - Electric Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"School" is the first track on Supertramp's third album, "Crime of the Century" (1974), and remains one of the band's great classics. A major part of Supertramp's sound is the extensive use of a Wurlitzer 200A electric piano, and "School" is no exception, containing a terrific minute-long (62 seconds) electric piano solo. Although Roger Hodgson wrote the song, Rick Davies composed the electric piano solo, and it is quite the solo, with a second, different electric piano part entering about two-thirds of the way through the solo.

This is a transcription of the entire 62-second electric piano solo, including both electric piano parts. Also included is the bass guitar part during the solo, so that the keyboardist can better understand what is going on underneath him/her during Rick Davies' excellent solo. This should also prove very helpful to bands that are working up "School" and want it to sound exactly right.

If you'd like to play Supertramp's "School" exactly as it was recorded, it is now available to you.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Supertramp - "School" (Electric Piano Solo)

Three Dog Night - One Man Band - 8-bar Organ Intro (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"One Man Band" was released in 1970 on Three Dog Night's "Naturally" album, with keyboards played by Jimmy Greenspoon. The song begins with eight bars of a harmonically-rich (fat chords) Hammond B-3 organ part that either uses both hands on two manuals or was double-tracked. This is a transcription of the B-3 organ part in those eight bars that kick off the song.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, just click: Three Dog Night - "One Man Band" (Organ Intro)

Tom Waits - I Can't Wait To Get Off Work - Piano Part (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

There are a lot of ways to say "I love you", and the prolific Tom Waits says it in his own way, such as in the title of this infrequently-heard classic: "I Can't Wait To Get Off Work and See My Baby on Montgomery Avenue", released in 1976 on his "Small Change" album. He can't wait to get off work to see the love of his life, and he creates a nightclub atmosphere with the music, while telling his love story.

The recording uses only piano and upright string bass to create a perfectly smoky nightclub sound. The key is Waits' choice of chords and voicings. He uses chords that are often found in jazz performances but rarely found in rock songs, such as an exquisitely-voiced G7(b13#9). To reinforce that intimate nightclub-trio sound, he also chooses voicings closer to jazz than rock or pop, often by leaving out the root of the chord completely and having the upright bass to play it instead.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the piano part for the entire 3:17 song - all 58 measures - exactly as Tom Waits himself played it. If you'd like to study some really wonderful jazz chord voicings of a master rock composer, this is your opportunity.

To see customers' comments about this transcription, click here, and also here.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is "I Can't Wait To Get Off Work" on YouTube.

If you want not only the piano part but also the upright bass part, a transcription is also available that contains the bass part note-for-note - every single bass note of the entire Tom Waits' recording. This transcription contains both the piano part and the bass part (three staves):

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P.S. A bit of trivia. Another of Waits' songs on the same "Small Change" album is "Tom Traubert's Blues", which I arranged and conducted almost every night on Rod Stewart's "Unplugged" concert tours.

Van Morrison - Moondance - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Moondance", the title song on Van Morrison's 1970 album, is the most frequently-played song by Morrison in concert,  the only song he's performed over a thousand times. The piano solo, played by Jeff Labes, combines elements of jazz and rock, and is one of the most important piano solos ever recorded because of its successful fusion of those elements.

The piano solo is 16 bars long, and is followed by a sax solo. This is a note-for-note transcription of the entire piano solo, plus the first four bars of the piano part behind the subsequent sax solo - both hands. The piano solo incorporates two-handed arpeggios, sixths, thirds, pentatonic and modal runs, broken octaves - lots of wonderful pianistic techniques, in just 16 measures.

If you've ever wanted to learn Van Morrison's "Moondance" piano solo exactly as it was recorded, here is your opportunity.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen, Just click: Van Morrison - "Moondance" Piano Solo

Warren Zevon - Lawyers, Guns and Money - Intro (transcribed & arranged by Elmo Peeler).pdf

Warren Zevon released "Lawyers, Guns and Money" in 1978 on his Excitable Boy album. Although there is no keyboard on the recording, I've transcribed the rhythm guitar and the bass guitar parts for the Intro exactly as played on the record, and arranged them for piano. This is a note-perfect transcription of the 6-bar Intro.

Difficulty: Easy

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To listen, just click: Warren Zevon - "Lawyers, Guns and Money" (6-bar Intro)

Warren Zevon - Werewolves of London - Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Werewolves of London" contains one of the most famous piano riffs in pop music - a repetitive two-bar phrase that never changes in the Right Hand, with slight variations in the Left Hand. This is a note-for-note transcription of the first twelve bars, which allows one to learn not only the main two-bar pattern but also to understand the Left Hand variations. If you'd like to play the piano part in"Werewolves of London" just as Warren Zevon recorded it, this is all you need.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is Warren Zevon's "Werewolves of London" on YouTube.

Widespread Panic - Disco - Piano Solo No. 2 (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

The Georgia-based jam band Widespread Panic first released "Disco" in their first live album, "Light Fuse, Get Away". Keyboardist John 'Jo-Jo' Hermann played a couple of piano solos on that recording. This is the second of those two solos, an eight-bar solo of running sixteenth-notes utilizing some important Southern-rock techniques: ascending 6th's, which Billy Powell of Lynyrd Skynyrd often used, and 'slide-off's', when the 2nd finger slides-off a minor third into the Major third of a chord.

This is a transcription of the 8-bar second piano solo, starting about :53 into the song. Also included are the following eight bars, when the piano solo has technically ended but an atmospheric, contrasting section continues.

Difficulty: Medium

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Here is Widespread Panic performing "Disco" on YouTube. This second piano solo starts at :53 seconds.

William Haviland - Both Sides Now - Piano Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

A talented pianist, William Haviland, has posted onto YouTube his own improvised version of Joni Mitchell's classic, "Both Sides Now". This is a particularly sensitive version of the song, showing a keen sense of space, chord voicings, and dynamics.

This is a note-for-note transcription of William Haviland's entire improvisation - all 85 measures, a little over 4 minutes long.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is William Haviland's "Both Sides Now" on YouTube.

Woody Woodpecker Theme - Piano Solo by BrasilianMusician (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

There's a terrific piano solo version of "The Woody Woodpecker Theme" posted onto YouTube by "BrasilianMusician" in a wonderful, honky-tonk style. Apparently BrasilianMusician's real name is Fabricio Paulo (or Fabricio Vinheteiro),  a talented South American professional pianist who has his own web site where he plays a wide variety of styles and pieces, from other TV show themes to Chopin.

This is a note-for-note transcription of his arrangement of the "Woody Woodpecker Song", which first appeared in Woody Woodpecker cartoons in 1948. This arrangement for piano solo incorporates a lot of the honky-tonk piano techniques used by saloon pianists in Western movies and TV shows, including a stride-style Left Hand, and three-note voicings of the melody where the Right Hand plays octaves plus a third note voiced a third under the top note, giving the piece a honky-tonk/ragtime style - sort of a Woody-Woodpecker-Meets-Miss-Kitty-in-the-Longbranch-Saloon feeling.

If you want to learn a short (just under a minute in length) but virtuosic piece to show off to friends that's guaranteed to bring a big smile to the face of everyone who hears it, this is perfect. It's a blast to learn and to perform!

To see a customer's comment on this transcription, click here.

Difficulty: Challenging

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Here is the Woody Woodpecker Theme as played by "BrasilianMusician" on YouTube.

Young-Holt Unlimited - Soulful Strut - Piano Parts (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1969 "Soulful Strut" was released and became one of the most successful instrumentals ever, reaching #3 on the charts in the U.S. and #1 in Canada. The story behind it is an interesting one. The track was first recorded in 1968 for Barbara Acklin's "Am I the Same Girl", using session musicians identified only as the Brunswick Studio Band. However, before it was released, producer Carl Davis removed Acklin's voice and hired a studio musician, Floyd Morris, to record the instrumental piano lead. "Soulful Strut", an instrumental, was released in November 1968, and Acklin's vocal song, "Am I the Same Girl", was released three months later in February 1969, reaching only #79 on the pop charts.

The original piano track from "Am I the Same Girl", a wonderful R&B-style piano part, was kept and mixed softly under the new piano part played by Floyd Morris, so "Soulful Strut" is one of the very few pop recordings with two piano tracks. If you'd like to play the precise piano part on "Am I the Same Girl", the second piano part on this transcription is exactly what you're looking for.

Young-Holt Unlimited was drummer "Red" Holt and bassist Eldee Young, formerly members of Ramsey Lewis' jazz trio. Neither Young nor Holt actually played on "Soulful Strut".

This is a note-for-note transcription of both piano parts for the entire song. If you'd like to play "Soulful Strut" exactly as it was recorded, this two-piano score is just what you need.

Difficulty: Medium

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Here is Young-Holt Unlimited's "Soulful Strut" on YouTube.

Richard Zimmerman - Waiting for the Robert E. Lee - Piano (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

"Waiting for the Robert E. Lee" was composed in 1912 and later featured in the first 'talkie' movie, "The Jazz Singer", in 1927. Recorded by Al Jolson, Benny Goodman, and many others, this version is a ragtime piano solo arranged by virtuoso ragtime pianist Richard Zimmerman.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Zimmerman's own version, recorded on his "Ragtime Favorites" in 1993 - all ten Verses. If you enjoy ragtime piano, this virtuoso ragtime showpiece will be a lot of fun to learn and to perform.

Difficulty: Challenging

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To listen, just click: Richard Zimmerman - Waiting for the Robert E. Lee (First 3 Verses)

The Zombies - She's Not There - Electric Piano Solo & Main Riff (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

One of the greatest keyboard solos in the 1960's was certainly the electric piano solo from "She's Not There" - The Zombies' 1964 hit. Played by Rod Argent on a Hohner Pianet. the solo perfectly captured the nebulous, minor-key feel of the song. And instead of staying within the confines of the pentatonic blues scale, Argent creatively used the Dorian mode before most other keyboardists of the day. However, this solo is difficult to pick out precisely and is never played correctly by cover bands.

Also difficult to pick out correctly is the main two-bar electric piano riff that begins the song and is played during both verses - it is also included. This is not a transcription of the entire song.

This is a note-for-note transcription of the electric piano solo, and of the main 2-bar riff.

Difficulty: Moderate

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To listen to the electric piano solo, click here: The Zombies - "She's Not There" (piano solo)

The Zombies (Rod Argent) - She's Not There - 1998 Organ Solo (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

In 1998 Rod Argent was interviewed in his home studio for a Dutch documentary about his classic song, "She's Not There". During the interview he played an instrumental version of "She's Not There" on a Hammond B3-type organ. When he got to the keyboard solo he improvised an entirely new and different solo than his 1964 classic solo.

This is a note-for-note transcription of Rod Argent's newer, 1998 organ solo in "She's Not There" (both hands). If you're a keyboard player in a cover band, this gives you the opportunity to include not one but two genuine Rod Argent solos in your performances. Or perhaps you'd just like to study how Argent continues to creatively utilize the Dorian mode in his improvisations 34 years later. Take advantage of the opportunity to learn both of Rod Argent's "She's Not There" solos, note-for-note.

Difficulty: Moderate

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Here is the Dutch "She's Not There" documentary on YouTube. This solo begins at approximately 11:20 into the documentary
 

Other Great Piano & Organ Parts:
(consider commissioning their transcription)
 

The Crusaders - Put It Where You Want It (Electric Piano Part).pdf

Booker T. & The MG's - Green Onions (Organ Solo).pdf

Ben Harper - Say You Will (Piano Part).pdf

Jerry Lee Lewis - Great Balls of Fire (Piano Solo).pdf

The Beatles - Rocky Raccoon (Honky-tonk Piano Part).pdf

The Animals - Bring It on Home to Me (Piano Part).pdf

George Winston - Before Barbed Wire.pdf

Elton John - Tiny Dancer (Intro).pdf

Groundhog Day (the movie) - Rock-maninoff (Piano Solo).pdf

Eagles - Peaceful Easy Feeling (Gtr Solo).pdf

B.B. King - Blue Shadows (Piano Part).pdf

Ricky Nelson - Travelin' Man (Piano Part).pdf

Ricky Nelson - Hello Mary Lou (Piano Part).pdf

The Doors - People Are Strange.pdf

If you'd like me to create a note-for-note transcription of a particular song, send me a request for a piano transcription.
 


Free Sheet Music
 

Coldplay - Clocks - Main Piano Riff (transcribed by Elmo Peeler).pdf

This is the main 4-bar piano riff that starts the song. Some pianists aren't clear as to what the left hand is supposed to do during this riff, so it is notated precisely in this accurate piano transcription. In addition to the original left hand part, an alternate left hand part is provided that has a better, fuller sound than the original part.

Difficulty: Easy

To get this free sheet music, just send me a request.

If you need the entire song, not just the main piano riff, click here.
 


ManyMIDI Products
Beverly Hills, CA
323-650-6602
sheetmusic@manymidi.com

Last modified: October 01, 2014